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College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences

Physical Address:
112 Administration Bldg
851 Campus Drive

Mailing Address:
College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 3154
Moscow, ID 83844-3154

Phone: 208-885-6426

Fax: 208-885-8964

Email: class@uidaho.edu

Web: College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences

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Five Classes We Wish We Could Take in CLASS

While we like to think that ALL of our classes in CLASS are interesting and meaningful, some of this fall’s classes stand out from the crowd. From diving deep into a particular topic to learning outside of the traditional classroom, here are five classes from the fall 2018 schedule that make us ready to run for the Registrar’s Office.  

Inside Out (SOC 404)

What better way to learn about the criminal justice system than to get to know those inside of it? In this fall’s “Inside Out” class, twelve University of Idaho students will take a class alongside twelve inmates at the Idaho Correctional Institution in Orofino. Class will take place in the prison, and both U of I students and inmates will earn credit for completing this course. This fall’s class will revolve around the topic of “Understanding Justice” and seeks to generate social change through transformative education. The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is operated in six countries and more than 40 states. The University of Idaho is the only institution in Idaho to partner with the program.

Taught by: Omi Hodwitz, assistant professor of sociology and criminology

Climate Change Fiction (ENGL 504)

It’s the 21st century and a new literature genre is emerging— Climate Change Fiction, or CliFi for short. This class explores fictional literature as a useful tool in communicating climate change. Students contribute to the live literary debate on the authenticity of CliFi as its own genre. This course was designed to appeal to students from any major—not just English, so class discussions draw from a wide variety of perspectives across campus.

Taught by: Erin James, associate professor of English

Plays of Pinter (THE 404)

See the U of I Department of Theatre Arts stage Harold Pinter’s “A Kind of Alaska” on Sept. 13-23 in Arena Theater.

He wrote 29 plays and 21 screenplays, directed 27 theater productions and wrote vast amounts of poetry, all within a 50-year span. Harold Pinter is perhaps one of the most influential playwrights of the English language and in this course, students learn directly from his works. Among countless other awards, Pinter received the Nobel Prize for Literature. What better way to learn than to study the best? This class digs deep into not only what students think about the material, but also how it makes them feel. It is as much an investigation of how people respond to a writer’s work as much as it is an investigation of the work itself.

Taught by: Robert Caisley, professor of theatre and head of the Dramatic Writing Program

Alexander Technique (MUSX 320)

The Alexander Technique, created by actor F. M. Alexander after he developed a vocal problem, is the process by which we observe and change our personal habits of thought and movement. In this class, students develop awareness skills that allow them to observe the conscious and unconscious choices they make in movement. The course explores the idea that much of what we think is beyond our control is actually within our complete control if we simply slow down and apply awareness. As students practice exercising choice and realization, the course material adapts to the individual discoveries they make. What’s better than a class that is all about you?

Taught by: Shawn Copeland, assistant professor of clarinet

Philosophy of Science (PHIL 351)

Once upon a time, people believed that the Earth was flat. Scientists also believed that Earth was the center of the universe. Over time, these scientific theories, among others, were proven wrong. So who’s to say that our current scientific theories are any more reliable? In this class, students challenge the objectivity of science and ask themselves how it is possible that anything can truly be proven, including concepts such as temperature and time. By the end of this class, students consider whether “hard sciences” (like chemistry and biology) are really all that different from “soft sciences” (like psychology and sociology).

Taught by: Aleta Quinn, assistant professor of philosophy

By Grace Wiese ’20
Published August 2018

Contact

College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences

Physical Address:
112 Administration Bldg
851 Campus Drive

Mailing Address:
College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 3154
Moscow, ID 83844-3154

Phone: 208-885-6426

Fax: 208-885-8964

Email: class@uidaho.edu

Web: College of Letters, Arts and Social Sciences

Map