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Contact

College of Natural Resources

Physical Address:
975 W. 6th Street
Moscow, Idaho

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1142
Moscow, ID 83844-1142

Phone: 208-885-8981

Fax: 208-885-5534

Email: cnr@uidaho.edu

Web: College of Natural Resources

google maps location

Michael Quist

Michael Quist, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Assistant Leader, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Office

CNR 102E

Phone

208-885-4064

Mailing Address

Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1141
Moscow, ID 83844-1141

Degrees

  • Ph.D. 2002 Kansas State University
  • M.S. 1999 Kansas State University
  • B.S. 1996 University of Idaho

Research Interests

Fisheries Management
Applied Fish Ecology
Age and Growth of Fishes
Community Ecology

Carter-Lynn, K. P., M. C. Quist, and M. Liter. In press. Population dynamics of channel catfish near the northern edge of their distribution: implications for management. Fisheries Management and Ecology.

Cooke, S. J., V. M. Nguyen, J. M. Dettmers, R. Arlinghaus, M. C. Quist, D. Tweddle, O. L. F. Weyl, R. Raghavan, M. Portocarrero-Aya, E. A. Cordoba, and I. G. Cowx. In press. Sustainable inland fisheries—perspectives from the recreational, commercial, and subsistence sectors from around the globe. Pages x-x in G. Cross, J. Olden, and M. Krosek, editors. Conservation of freshwater fish. Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom.

Ng, E. L., J. P. Fredericks, and M. C. Quist. In press. Evaluation of post-release mortality of gill-net captured lake trout. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management.

Ng, E. L., J. P. Fredericks, M. C. Quist. In press. Population dynamics and evaluation of alternative management goals for nonnative Lake Trout in a large western lake. North American Journal of Fisheries Management.

Parks, T. P., M. C. Quist, and C. L. Pierce. In press. Anthropogenic disturbance and environmental associations with fish assemblages in two nonwadeable rivers. River Research and Applications.

Smith, C. D., M. C. Quist, and R. S. Hardy. In press. Comparison of electrofishing, hoop nets, and benthic trawls for fishes in two western North American rivers. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management.

Smith, C. D., M. C. Quist, and R. S. Hardy. In press. Fish assemblage structure and habitat associations in a large western river system. River Research and Applications.

Walrath, J. D., M. C. Quist, and J. A. Firehammer. In press. Population structure and dynamics of northern pike and smallmouth bass in Coeur d’Alene Lake, Idaho. Northwest Science.

Watkins, C. J., B. S. Stevens, M. C. Quist, B. B. Shepard, and S. C. Ireland. In press. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and habitat use among main- and side-channel environments in the lower Kootenai River, Idaho. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.

Whitlock, S. L., M. C. Quist, and A. M. Dux. In press. Incubation success and habitat selection of shore-spawning kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka: effects of water level regulation and habitat characteristics. Ecology of Freshwater Fish.

Bakevich, B. D., C. L. Pierce, and M. C. Quist. 2015. Status of the Topeka shiner in west-central Iowa. American Midland Naturalist 174:350-358.

Klein, Z. B., M. C. Quist, D. T. Rhea, and A. C. Senecal. 2015. Habitat use of non-native burbot in a western river. Hydrobiologia 757:61-71.

Klein, Z. B., M. C. Quist, D. T. Rhea, and A. C. Senecal. 2015. Sampling techniques for burbot in a western non-wadeable river. Fisheries Management and Ecology 22:213-223.

McCormick, J. L., M. C. Quist, and D. J. Schill. 2015. Evaluation of angler reporting accuracy in an off-site survey to estimate statewide steelhead harvest. Fisheries Management and Ecology 22:134-142.

Walrath, J. D., M. C. Quist, and J. A. Firehammer. 2015. Trophic ecology of nonnative northern pike and their effect on conservation of native westslope cutthroat trout. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 35:158-177.

Watkins, C. J., T. J. Ross, R. S. Hardy, and M. C. Quist. 2015. Precision of hard structures used to estimate age of mountain whitefish. Western North American Naturalist 75:1-7.

Watkins, C. J., Z. B. Klein, M. M. Terrazas, and M. C. Quist. 2015. Influence of sectioning location on age estimates from common carp dorsal spines. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 35:690-697.

Fischer, J. R., and M. C. Quist. 2014. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 186:4461-4474.

Fischer, J. R., and M. C. Quist. 2014. Gear and seasonal bias associated with abundance and size structure estimates for lentic freshwater fishes. Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management 5:394-412.

Klein, Z. B., M. M. Terrazas, and M. C. Quist. 2014. Age estimation of burbot using pectoral fin rays, branchiostegal rays and otoliths. Intermountain Journal of Sciences 20:57-67.

Parks, T. P., M. C. Quist, and C. L. Pierce. 2014. Historic changes in fish assemblage structure in midwestern nonwadeable rivers. American Midland Naturalist 171:27-53.

Porter, N. J., T. F. Bonvechio, J. L. McCormick, and M. C. Quist. 2014. Population dynamics of bowfin in a south Georgia reservoir: latitudinal comparisons of population structure, growth, and mortality. Journal of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies 1:103-109.

Quist, M. C., and R. D. Schultz. 2014. Effects of management legacies on stream fish and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Environmental Management 54:449-464.

Smith, C. D., J. R. Fischer, and M. C. Quist. 2014. Historical changes in Nebraska's lotic fish assemblages: a spatiotemporal assessment. American Midland Naturalist 172:160-184.

Whitlock, S. L., M. C. Quist, and A. M. Dux. 2014. Influence of habitat characteristics on shore-spawning kokanee. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 143:1404-1418.

Fish Assemblage Structure in Small Stream Systems
Understanding factors related to the occurrence and abundance of stream fishes is a central focus of both basic and applied ecology. One of my major research directions has been determining how abiotic habitat characteristics and biotic interactions regulate fish assemblage structure in stream systems. Because mechanisms influencing the distributions and abundance of stream fishes act across various spatial and temporal scales, I often use a variety of approaches to determine the magnitude and importance of multiple scales when addressing these research questions. In addition to my interests on the effects of multiple, often hierarchical scales, I am also interested in the interplay between abiotic habitat conditions and biotic interactions in lotic systems, particularly with regard to anthropogenic disturbances to stream habitat (e.g., water development, land use in the watershed) and the introduction of bioinvasive species. Although I have conducted several studies on factors influencing the occurrence of small stream species, I am especially interested in the application of principals and techniques commonly used to assess sport fishes (e.g., growth and mortality analyses) on stream fish populations.

Ecology of Large River Systems
Large rivers represent some of the most altered ecosystems in North America. Consequently, another of my primary research directions has focused on anthropogenic influences to native fishes in large-river systems. In particular, I am interested in the effects of habitat modification due to water development (e.g., impoundments, diversion structures), how these changes facilitate the introduction and naturalization of bioinvasive fishes, and how altered habitat conditions and biotic interactions work in synergy to influence native species in large rivers. In addition to issues related to native species conservation, I am also interested in the effects of habitat modification and exploitation (i.e., commercial and recreational harvest) on fish population dynamics in large rivers.

Fish Assemblages and Population Dynamics in Lake and Reservoir Systems
Similar to my research in lotic systems, my research in lake and reservoir systems focuses on the magnitude, importance, and interactions of abiotic and biotic conditions. I seek to take an integrative approach to my research on fishes in lentic systems by focusing on all aspects (i.e., growth, recruitment, and mortality) of their population dynamics and factors influencing the structure of fish assemblages. Consequently, my approach to answering questions related to the ecology of lakes and reservoirs is multifaceted, including the use of long-term, spatially-extensive data sets, field studies that focus on different ontogentic stages (i.e., larvae, juveniles, adults), experimental manipulations to elucidate mechanistic relationships, and ecological models to investigate factors influencing growth, recruitment, and mortality. Some of the most interesting and challenging aspects of conducting research on fishes in lakes and reservoirs, particularly reservoirs, are the dynamic nature of abiotic characteristics and the fact that many introduced and native species have little or no evolutionary history of co-occurrence. As such, I incorporate these concepts into my research whenever possible.

Management Tools
Another major research direction has focused on the application and development of tools and techniques used by fishery managers. One research focus has been on the use, application, and development of indices (e.g., size structure, condition, recruitment, mortality, growth) used to evaluate and monitor fish populations. In addition to these interests, I am also interested in and have developed novel techniques for sampling and assessing populations that can be used to address issues and concerns related to fisheries management and conservation.

Synergism among Major Research Directions
Although I have interests and have conducted research over a diverse array of species and ecosystems, several overall themes in my research are apparent. My research attempts to account for multiple factors (i.e., abiotic and biotic characteristics) and their interactive effects. Regardless of the species or system, I strive to take an integrative approach that utilizes information from a variety of disciplines and techniques (e.g., field studies, experimental manipulation, ecological modeling) to provide meaningful insight and answers to research questions. Basic ecological ideas can provide a foundation and conceptual framework for research; therefore, I strive to integrate basic ecological concepts with applied research questions. Such studies appeal to the general scientific community and contribute to our understanding of basic ecological principles, while at the same time answer questions that have practical utility. Lastly, nearly all of my research is directed at questions that are meaningful to natural resource managers, regardless of whether the focus is on native species conservation or sport fisheries management.

Contact

College of Natural Resources

Physical Address:
975 W. 6th Street
Moscow, Idaho

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1142
Moscow, ID 83844-1142

Phone: 208-885-8981

Fax: 208-885-5534

Email: cnr@uidaho.edu

Web: College of Natural Resources

google maps location