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Idaho Asia Institute

Idaho Asia Institute

Physical Address:
AD 204, Administration Building
851 Campus Drive
Moscow, ID 83844

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive
MS 3179
Moscow, ID 83844-3179

Phone: 208-885-7110

Email: class-asia@uidaho.edu

Events

The Asia on the Palouse Speakers Series brings renowned Asia scholars to Moscow to present their latest research and engage with our university community.

Spring 2022

January 26: Puck Brecher (History, WSU), "Eurasian Experience in Wartime Japan: A Revisionist History", 10:30 AM, Aurora Room, ISUB
March 22: Judy Ju-Hui Han (Gender Studies, UCLA), "A Contentious History of Feminism in Korea", 3:30 PM, room tbd, Co-sponsored by Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
April 11: Ho-fung Hung (Sociology, Johns Hopkins), "From the China Boom to U.S.-China Rivalry", 3:30 PM, Clearwater Room, ISUB
April 25: Brian Hurley (Asian Studies, Texas), "Reading the Market with Murakami Haruki in 1980s Japan" 10:30 AM, room tbd, Co-sponsored by Modern Languages and Cultures

Fall 2021

Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021 — 3:30-4:45 p.m. in TLC 031:

Sundiata Keita Cha-Jua (University of Illinois)
Co-sponsored by the School of Journalism and Mass Media

Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021  — 3:30-4:45 p.m. in TLC 032:

Aaron Skabelund (BYU) speaking on "Inglorious, Illegal Bastards: Japan's Self-Defense Force during the Cold War"
Co-sponsored by the Department of History  

Previous Speakers, co-sponsored by the Confucius Institute, under the “China on the Palouse” banner: 

2020-21

Marta Hanson (Johns Hopkins University), “From the Sick Man of Asia to Sick Uncle Sam: The Case of Traditional Chinese Medicine and COVID-19”
Harold Tanner (University of North Texas), “Did George Marshall Really Lose China?” 
Marcella Szablewicz (Pace University), “From Internet Addicts to e-Sports Athletes: Digital Game Culture in China”
Andrew Jones (University of California, Berkeley), “The Chinese Jazz Age” 
Reed Chervin (University of Colorado), “The China-India Border: Past, Present, and Future” 
Ambassador Chas Freeman (Brown University), “Sino-American Antagonism: How Does this End?” 
Stefania Travagnin (University of London), “‘Non-Eminent Nuns’ in Modern Sichuan Buddhism: Listening to the Marginal Female Experience”

2019-20

Robert V. Percival (University of Maryland), “China’s Environmental Courts: An Assessment”
Dong Luo (South China University of Technology), “The Unity of Heaven, Earth, and Human Beings in Ancient Chinese Thought”
Qinna Shen (Bryn Mawr College), “Prelude to German Reunification: Beijing and Berlin in 1989” 

2018-20

You Qiang (University of Idaho), “Relationships between the Ancient Chinese Philosophy of the I-Ching and Modern Science”
Anna Sun (Kenyon College), “Global Confucianism in the 21st Century” 
Wang Ping (Macalester College), “We Are Water: Kinship of the Yangtze and Mississippi”
Anna Pegler-Gordon (Michigan State University), “From East to East: Chinese Migration and the Hidden History of Ellis Island”
Mark Warner (University of Idaho), “To Our North and South: Exploring Chinese Communities on Either Side of the Palouse through Archaeology” 
Thomas Talhelm (University of Chicago), “The Rice Theory of Culture”

Spring 2022

All talks are at noon, in IRIC 305
February 10: Mark Coleman (Professor, Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences, U of I), "Poplar Trees in China: An Enduring Symbol and a Tool for Environmental Change"
February 25: MJ Vega (MA in History, WSU), "'A Citizen Same As You And I': Japanese American Student Relocation to Moscow, Idaho and Pullman, Washington, 1942-1945"
April 7: Xiao Hu (Associate Professor, Architecture, U of I), "Crafting Greener and More Livable cities: China's Emerging New Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change"

From Missionary Education to Confucius Institutes: Historical Reflections on Sino-American Educational Exchange

A one-day, international conference of scholars studying the history and current state of Sino-American educational exchange. Conference is online, free and open to the public.

8:40 a.m. to 5 p.m. PDT Monday, November 1, 2021 on Zoom

Register here for the Zoom Webinar

View the conference schedule

Friday, November 12, 2021, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Crest Room, Idaho Student Union Building, University of Idaho
For those who can't make it in person, there will be a Zoom webinar option. Register for the online webinar.

Co-sponsors: Idaho Asia Institute and the Department of English

Moderated by Scott Slovic, Department of English, University of Idaho

Speakers:

Qiang Pi, Tongji University and the University of Idaho, “The Cross-Cultural Representation of the Environmental Themes in Jiang Rong’s Wolf Totem”

Qiang Pi is a Ph.D. student at the College of Foreign Languages, Tongji University, China, and is currently a visiting scholar at the University of Idaho. He received his master’s degree in Translation Studies from the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies. His research focuses on the intersection between ecocriticism and translation studies. He is particularly interested in understanding the cross-cultural translation of Chinese literature into the English world and developing new theories with regard to the phenomenon of translation. He has published a book review of Zhao’s Translation and Modern China (2018) and an article titled “Translation through a Zen Mind: Sam Hamill’s Translation of Li Bai’s ‘Du Zuo Jing Ting Shan’.” 

Cheng Li, Yale University, “Planting the Borderland: Politics, Nature, and Ethnic Borderlands in Maoist Ecocinema”

Cheng Li is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. He is interested in modern Chinese literature and culture, environmental humanities, and migration studies. His articles appear in Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, Environmental History, and Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism. While teaching environmental humanities of China and East Asia this semester, he has been working on his dissertation, tentatively titled “Trees and the Making of Modern China.” 

Xinmin Liu, Washington State University, “Greenwashing and Its Discontent: Affect in a Chinese Muslim’s Search for Ethnic Roots”

Xinmin Liu is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Cultures at Washington State University. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Yale in 1997. Since 2005, he has focused in his research on cultural geography, landscape aesthetics, and ecocriticism in China and the West and has just completed co-editing (with Dr. Peter I-min Huang) a volume of ecocritical writings titled Embodied Memories, Embedded Healing: New Ecological Perspectives from East Asia (forthcoming from Lexington Books in November 2021).

 

Idaho Asia Institute

Idaho Asia Institute

Physical Address:
AD 204, Administration Building
851 Campus Drive
Moscow, ID 83844

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive
MS 3179
Moscow, ID 83844-3179

Phone: 208-885-7110

Email: class-asia@uidaho.edu