Justice and Jurisdiction: Native Judges to Address Current Issues Facing Tribal Courts

Wednesday, September 15 2010


Written by Donna Emert
 
MOSCOW, Idaho – The University of Idaho College of Law will host a distinguished panel of tribal judges to discuss issues of justice and jurisdiction on Friday, Sept. 24.

Tribal judge panelists for the 2010 event include: The Honorable William “Bill” Douglas, chief judge for the Coeur d’Alene Tribal Court; Hon. Fred Gabourie Sr., chief appellate justice for the Sho-Ban Tribal Court of Appeals; Hon. Cynthia Jordan, chief judge for the Kootenai Tribal Court and tribal judge for the Coeur d’Alene Tribal Court; and the Hon. Mitchell “Mitch” Wright, chief judge for the Ely Shoshone Tribal Court.

“The four panelists bring a wealth of experience from the bench and bar to help prepare the next wave of law graduates who will work with issues involving tribal law,” said Angelique EagleWoman, University of Idaho law professor, who describes the annual event as “one of the highlights of the year for the law students and American Indian Studies students in my Native American Law course.”

The Tribal Judge Panel presentation will open with a welcome from College of Law Dean Don Burnett, who formerly served as a tribal judge for the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation in southeastern Idaho.

Panelists will present to students in the college’s Native American Law course, and will then be available to the public at a meet-and-greet luncheon in the Native American Student Center, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Soup, chili and fixings will be provided by the Native American Law Student Association. The luncheon is free of charge.

The event is sponsored by the University of Idaho College of Law Native Law program and NALSA.
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About the University of Idaho
Founded in 1889, the University of Idaho is the state’s land-grant institution and its principal graduate education and research university, bringing insight and innovation to the state, the nation and the world. University researchers attract nearly $100 million in research grants and contracts each year. The University of Idaho is the only institution in the state to earn the prestigious Carnegie Foundation classification for high research activity. The student population of 12,302 includes first-generation college students and ethnically diverse scholars, who select from more than 130 degree options in the colleges of Agricultural and Life Sciences; Art and Architecture; Business and Economics; Education; Engineering; Law; Letters, Arts and Social Sciences; Natural Resources; and Science. The university also is charged with the statewide mission for medical education through the WWAMI program. The university combines the strength of a large university with the intimacy of small learning communities and focuses on helping students to succeed and become leaders. It is home to the Vandals, the 2009 Roady’s Humanitarian Bowl champions. For more information, visit www.uidaho.edu.






About the University of Idaho
The University of Idaho helps students to succeed and become leaders. Its land-grant mission furthers innovative scholarly and creative research to grow Idaho's economy and serve a statewide community. From its main campus in Moscow, Idaho, to 70 research and academic locations statewide, U-Idaho emphasizes real-world application as part of its student experience. U-Idaho combines the strength of a large university with the intimacy of small learning communities. It is home to the Vandals, and competes in the Western Athletic Conference. For information, visit www.uidaho.edu.