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Contact

Athletic Training Program

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
Moscow, Idaho 83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-2182

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: ui-at@uidaho.edu

Integrated Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Therapies (ISMaRT) Clinic

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-1673

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: atclinic@uidaho.edu

Integrated Sports Medicine Movement Analysis Laboratory (ISMMAL)

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
Moscow, Idaho 83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-1155

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: ui-at@uidaho.edu

Research

Successful practice as an athletic trainer, no matter the setting, requires a versatile approach to practice and the ability to translate research to practice. We believe in the full evidence-based practice model of incorporating the best literature evidence, clinical expertise and individual patient needs. Idaho's athletic training programs engage in patient care research that aims to transform healthcare by enhancing evidence-based practice and creating practice-based evidence.

Every athletic training faculty member maintains a balance of applied and laboratory research while serving to mentor student-led projects. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research to solve problems in clinical practice and directly improve their patient care.

Faculty, students and alumni have received grant funding to support research and have shared their research findings at professional conferences and in academic journals. A selection of published works is listed below.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

  • Stevenson, V, Baker, RT, Nasypany, AM, May, J, Uriarte, M, (In Press) Title: Using the MyoKinesthetic System to Treat Bilateral Chronic Knee Pain: A Case Study. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine
  • Bonser, B, Hancock, C, Loutch, R, Zeigel, A, Stanford E, Baker, RT, Nasypany, AM, May, J, Cheatham, S, (In Press). Changes in Hamstring Range of Motion Following Neurodynamic Sciatic Sliders: A Critically Appraised Topic. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation.
  • Hudson, R, Richmond, A, Sanchez, B, Stevenson, V, Baker, RT, May J, Nasypany AM, Reordan, D, (2016). An Alternative Approach to the treatment of meniscal pathologies: A case series analysis of the Mulligan Concept. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 11(4): 564-574.
  • Fyock M, Nasypany AM, Seegmiller JG, Baker RT (2016). Treating patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome using regional interdependence theory: A critically appraised topic. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 21(3):5-11.
  • Hansberger BL, Baker RT, May J, & Nasypany A. Incorporating neurodynamics in the treatment of lower leg pain: a case review. (In Press – Athletic Training and Sports Health Care).
  • Syverston P, Baker RT, & Nasypany A. (2016). Avulsion fracture of the anterior superior iliac spine and the iliac crest: a mindfulness approach to rehabilitation.International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 21(1):24-29.
  • May J, Krzyanowicz R, Nasypany A, Baker R, & Seegmiller J. (2015). Mulligan concept use and clinical profile from the perspective of American certified Mulligan practitioners. Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 24:337-341.
  • Brody K, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2015). Treatment of meniscal lesions using the mulligan “squeeze” technique: a case series. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(6):24-31.
  • Rhinehart AJ, Schroeder KM, May J, Baker R, Nasypany AM. (2015). Movement assessment: techniques and possible integration into clinical practice.International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(6):5-9.
  • Baker RT, Hansberger BL, Warren L, & Nasypany A. (2015). A novel approach for the reversal of chronic apparent hamstring tightness: a case report.International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 10(5): 723-734.
  • Hansberger BL, Baker RT, May J, & Nasypany A. (2015). A novel approach to treating plantar fasciitis – effects of primal reflex release technique: a case series.International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 10(5): 690-701.
  • Rhinehart AJ. (2015). Effective treatment of an apparent meniscal injury using the Mulligan Concept. Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences: The Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers' Association, 1(2):Article 4.
  • Brody K, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2015). Meniscal lesions: the physical examination and evidence for conservative treatment. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(5):35-38.
  • McMurray J, Landis S, Lininger K, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller J. (2015). A comparison and review of indirect myofascial release therapy, instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization, and active release techniques to inform clinical decision-making. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(5):29-34.
  • Brody K, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & May J. (2015). The myokinesthetic system, part 2: treatment of chronic low back pain. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(5):22-28.
  • Brody K, Baker RT, Nasypany, A, & May J. (2015). The myokinesthetic system, part 1: a clinical assessment and matching treatment intervention. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(4):5-9.
  • Loutsch RA, Baker RT, May JM, & Nasypany AM. (2015). Reactive neuromuscular training results in immediate and long-term improvements of measures of hamstring flexibility: a case report. International Journal of Sport Physical Therapy, 10(3):371-377.
  • Thompson MA, Lee SS, Seegmiller J, McGowan CP. (2015). Kinematic and kinetic comparison of barefoot and shod running in mid/forefoot and rearfoot strike runners. Gait & Posture, 41:957-959.
  • Krzyanowicz R, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2015). Patient outcomes utilizing the selective functional movement assessment and mulligan mobilizations with movement on recreational dancers with sacroiliac joint pain. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(3):31-37.
  • Seegmiller JG, Nasypany A, Kahanov L, Seegmiller J, & Baker RT. (2015). Trends in doctoral education among health professions: An integrative review. Athletic Training Education Journal, 10(1):47-56.
  • Matocha M, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2015). Effects of neuromobilization on tendinopathy: Part 2. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(2), 41-47.
  • Matocha M, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2015). Effects of neuromobilization on tendinopathy: Part 1. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(2), 36-40.
  • Eusea J, Nasypany A, Seegmiller JG, & Baker RT. (2015). Utilizing Mulligan sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGS) within a clinical prediction rule for treatment of low back pain (LBP) in a secondary school football player. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 20(1), 18-24.
  • Thompson MA, Gutmann A, Seegmiller J, & McGowan CP. (2014). The effect of stride length on the dynamics of barefoot and shod running. Journal of Biomechanics, 47:2745-2750.
  • Warren L, Baker RT, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2014). Core concepts: Understanding the complexity of the spinal stabilizing system in local and global injury prevention and treatment. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 19(6), 28-33.
  • Gamma SC, Baker RT, Iorio S, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2014). A Total Motion Release warm-up improves dominant arm shoulder internal and external rotation in baseball players. International Journal of Sport Physical Therapy, 9(4), 509-517.
  • Mau H, & Baker RT. (2014). A modified mobilization with movement to treat a lateral ankle sprain. International Journal of Sport Physical Therapy, 9(4), 540-548.
  • Baker RT, Van Riper M, Nasypany A, & Seegmiller JG. (2014). Evaluation and treatment of apparent reactive tendinopathy of the biceps brachii. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 19(4), 14-21.
  • Baker RT, Nasypany A, Seegmiller JG, & Baker JG. (2013). Instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization treatment for tissue extensibility dysfunction.International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 18(5), 16-21.
  • ohnston K, Baker RT, & Baker JG. (2013). Use of auscultation and percussion to evaluate a suspected fracture. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 18(3), 1-6. 
  • Baker RT, Nasypany A, Seegmiller JG, & Baker JG. (2013). Treatment of acute torticollis using positional release therapy: Part 2. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 18(2), 38-43.
  • Baker RT, Nasypany A, Seegmiller JG, & Baker JG. (2013). Treatment of acute torticollis using positional release therapy: Part 1. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 18(2), 34-37.
  • Baker RT, Nasypany A, Seegmiller JG, & Baker JG. (2013). The mulligan concept: Mobilizations with movement. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 18(1), 34-38.
  • Baker RT, Sanchez BJ, Cady AC, & Zinder SM. (2012). Repetitive nonunion fracture of the tibia and fibula in a soccer player. International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training, 17(1), 29-35.

A comprehensive list of scholarly products of the University of Idaho Athletic Training Programs is also available.

Contact

Athletic Training Program

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
Moscow, Idaho 83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-2182

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: ui-at@uidaho.edu

Integrated Sports Medicine and Rehabilitative Therapies (ISMaRT) Clinic

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-1673

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: atclinic@uidaho.edu

Integrated Sports Medicine Movement Analysis Laboratory (ISMMAL)

Mailing Address:
College of Education, Health and Human Sciences
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2401
Moscow, Idaho 83844-2401

Phone: (208) 885-1155

Fax: (208) 885-5929

Email: ui-at@uidaho.edu