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Counseling & Testing

Counseling and Testing Center
Mary E. Forney Hall, Rm 306
1210 Blake Avenue
University of Idaho
Moscow, ID 83844-3140
phone: 208-885-6716
fax: 208-885-4354

Hours

Counseling and Testing Center Hours
Monday-Friday
8:00 am-5:00 pm (academic year)
Monday-Friday
7:30 am-4:30 pm (summer)

Testing Number

Testing Phone: 885-5138

Crisis Numbers

CTC After-hours Crisis Line: 208-885-6716

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Internship Training Activities

INTERNSHIP TRAINING ACTIVITIES

The internship program has been designed to provide both didactic and experiential training activities that follow a developmental sequence. We provide the necessary structure, guidance, and support to facilitate the development of each intern as he or she moves towards greater autonomy, and gains the skills, knowledge, and confidence to master increasingly complex tasks and decisions during the course of the training year. Training Activities include: 

Training Activity

Description

 

Initial Orientation Formal orientation is first 2 weeks of internship

Interns arrive on campus 2 weeks prior to the start of classes. The first 2-4 weeks of the internship are designed to introduce the interns to the University of Idaho Counseling & Testing Center, and facilitate their transition to internship. During this time, interns learn about the philosophy and operating procedures of the CTC, meet the faculty and staff, and learn about other campus and community resources and referrals. In addition, interns attend a variety of intensive training seminars related to each of the core components. Each intern also develops learning goals, a training contract and schedule in consultation with the Training Director and their individual supervisor. The interns and the Training Director also go on a mini-retreat at the beginning and end of the internship year. The primary goals of the retreat are to facilitate the development of collegial relationships, to set and review interests, goals, and the development of professional identity while in a relaxed setting.

Initial Evaluation

Interns identify and assess client concerns, assess level of functioning, diagnose disorders using the DSM-5, recommend treatment options. The Center does not use a case disposition system so all staff, including interns, generally continue with clients that they see for initial assessment. Interns are prepared for initial evaluations during Orientation, ongoing training seminars, individual and group supervision.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Individual Counseling

Due to the high demand for counseling, the CTC uses a brief treatment model (8-10 sessions). Interns provide short-term, individual personal counseling and psychotherapy. Interns implement effective interventions based on scholarly inquiry and empirically based/supported treatments. Interns may select several clients to work with on a longer-term basis in order to gain experience with both brief and long-term counseling. Each intern’s clinical caseload provides an opportunity to work with ethnically and culturally diverse clients. Interns are prepared for individual counseling and psychotherapy through seminars in orientation, seminars held throughout the year, individual and group supervision, and weekly clinical consultations.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

 

Couples Counseling

Interns have the opportunity to work with couples who are experiencing difficulties in their relationship. Interns typically begin working with couples during their second semester of internship, unless they have prior experience.  Interns receive training in the Clinical and Professional Topics seminar in the evidence-based theory and techniques of John Gottman, Ph.D.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity, Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis, Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention,.

Group Counseling

Group counseling is not a major emphasis at the CTC; therefore opportunities for group counseling experience are limited. The CTC has chosen to emphasize Stress Reduction and Mindfulness as their primary group offerings. In addition, interns gain experience facilitating brief drug and alcohol psycho-educational groups.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Crisis Intervention

Interns provide crisis intervention and assessment coverage during assigned weekly shifts during regular office hours. The number of crisis clients per week varies depending on the time of the semester. There is a designated back-up psychologist and supervisor available to provide consultation and assistance to interns as needed. Interns are not required to be on call for crisis intervention after hours. The CTC contracts with ProtoCall to provide after-hours crisis telephone coverage. If one of your clients accesses the crisis counseling hotline, you will receive a written summary report of the telephone session. Interns are prepared for crisis intervention and assessment during Orientation, ongoing training seminars, and individual and group supervision.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Consultation & Outreach

Interns are assigned to serve as a counseling center liaison and consultant to other campus offices that serve students. Interns have served as liaisons to the Women’s Center, the LGBQTA Office, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the College Migrant Assistance Program (CAMP), the Native American Student Center and Residence Life. Interns conduct consultation and outreach activities in a variety of modalities including presentations to living groups, classes, university events, psycho-educational display booths, and National Mental Health Screening Days. Interns may also consult with faculty, staff, students, and parents about psychological issues. Interns receive training during Orientation, an ongoing Consultation & Outreach Seminar and individual and group supervision.

Related Curriculum Areas: Theories and/or Methods of Consultation; Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Diversity

Interns are trained in the ADDRESSING model (Hays, 2001; Hays & Iwamasa, 2006) in order to understand clients’ worldview and values, and integrate multicultural factors into case conceptualization, treatment and diagnosis. Interns are also expected to demonstrate awareness of their own attitudes and beliefs that can influence interactions with and treatment of individuals whose identity is different from the intern therapist and to familiarize themselves with relevant literature, research and theory regarding diversity and multicultural counseling competencies. Interns receive diversity training during Orientation, an ongoing Diversity Seminar, case presentations and individual and group supervision.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Testing & Assessment

Interns gain direct clinical experience and skills administering and interpreting various testing and assessment instruments and batteries relevant to the work of a university counseling center. Training in this area includes clinical assessments, personality inventories, intelligence tests, neuropsychological screening measures and measures of career interests and skills. The major emphasis is on conducting assessments for learning disabilities and ADD. Interns are required to administer a minimum number of comprehensive psycho-educational batteries targeted at learning disabilities or ADHD and complete an Integrated Assessment Report for each client. The number of assessment batteries is determined by the Testing & Assessment supervisor based on the individual intern’s skills and interests. In addition, interns are required to use personality assessment instruments with selected clients during the internship year. Interns are prepared for Testing and Assessment during Orientation, a weekly Testing Seminar and individual and group supervision.

Related Curriculum Areas: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Supervision Given: Provision Of Supervision For Graduate Practicum Students

(90 minutes fall & spring semester)

 

Each intern provides individual clinical supervision during the academic year for 1-2 practicum students. Practicum supervisees are typically doctoral- level students from Washington State University who are enrolled in a graduate program in psychology. Interns are prepared for supervision of practicum students during orientation, a regularly scheduled Supervision of Supervision Seminar that meets weekly during the year, and individual and group supervision. The Practicum Coordinator and the Training Director, as well as the individual supervisors, are available for ongoing consultation about supervision issues.

Related Curriculum Areas: Theories and/or Methods of Supervision; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

Supervision Received: Individual Supervision

(2 hours @ week year-round)

 

Individual supervision is viewed as central to the internship experience and is at the core of transmitting knowledge, skill development, ethical guidelines, and facilitating the development of professional identity and personal growth. The intern’s individual clinical supervisor serves as the primary mentor. However, all CTC faculty participate in the training program and provide some form of supervision for interns. Interns meet with their individual supervisor weekly to discuss theories, models, ethics, and techniques of effective counseling, to discuss their own development as a psychologist, and to review individual cases and recorded counseling sessions.  The functions of the supervisory relationship include monitoring client welfare, enhancing intern skills, promoting personal and professional growth and evaluating the intern's skills and professional development on a continuous basis.

Interns have the opportunity to work with a different primary supervisor each semester to experience more breadth and variety in the individual supervision experience through exposure to a variety of supervisory styles and mentorship. Both interns and supervisors have input into the decisions about supervisory matches.

Interns are required to record their counseling sessions for review with their supervisors. Our faculty uses a consultative model of supervision; supervisors consult with one another about trainee development and progress on a regular basis.  The internship training program functions in a manner consistent with the American Psychological Association’s 2002 Ethical Standard 7.04 (Student Disclosure of Personal Information) as contained in the Revised Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA 2002).

Related Curriculum Areas: Theories and/or Methods of Supervision; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry; Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments.

Supervision Received: Supervision of Group Counseling 

 (Variable as needed)

Interns meet with a faculty supervisor weekly when they are co-facilitating a group to review group counseling sessions and discuss theories, models, ethics, and techniques of effective group counseling and their own development as a group facilitator.

Related Curriculum Areas: Theories and/or Methods of Supervision; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry; Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments.                                        

Supervision Received: Group Supervision- Clinical

 (1 hour @ week, year-round)

 

Interns meet with rotating faculty supervisors in weekly group supervision to discuss and review recorded counseling sessions, exchange ideas and feedback, and integrate theory and research with clinical practice. Interns take turns presenting clinical cases on a rotating basis.

Related Curriculum Areas: Theories and/or Methods of Supervision; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry; Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.


Supervision Received: Group Supervision- Psychiatric

(1 hour @ week, year- round)

 

Interns meet with the university psychiatrist (and CTC faculty) to consult about clients referred for psychiatric services and discuss broad issues of diagnosis, treatment and medication.

Related Curriculum Area: Issues of Cultural & Individual Diversity; Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis; Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention; Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments; Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry.

CLINICAL STAFF MEETING

(Variable meeting schedule, Fall & Spring semesters)

 

Interns attend a staff meeting with all CTC faculty to discuss cases and clinical topics. Interns and faculty take turns presenting cases. Interns are required to make a formal case presentation twice during the internship year, once each in fall and spring semester. The main goal for the intern case presentations is to allow interns the opportunity to gain experience making a formal case presentation to other professionals, discuss clinical issues with the group, and give and receive feedback. Interns receive an evaluation and written feedback from participants about their case presentations.

 

PSYCHIATRIC ROTATION -Required

(Rotations are typically 8 weeks @ 2-3 hrs @ week, Fall & Spring semesters)

 

 

Interns complete a rotation with the university psychiatrist to gain more exposure to diagnostic and mental status interviewing and assessment techniques, psychopharmacological treatment, and consultation with another health care professional. They shadow the psychiatrist while he meets with patients and also have the opportunity to consult with the psychiatrist on an individual basis. Most of the time is spent observing and participating in clinical consultations with patients, while the rest of the time may be spent consulting about specific topics, cases, or pharmacological treatments. Interns also receive weekly group supervision from the psychiatrist.

ALCOHOL & DRUG ROTATION-Required

(Rotations are typically 8 weeks @ 2-4 hrs @week, Fall & Spring semesters)

Interns gain experience facilitating brief drug and alcohol psycho-educational groups during a one semester rotation block. The CTC utilizes a brief Alcohol Abuse Prevention and Harm Reduction Program (CHOICES) and a Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention Program for College Students (BASICS). These programs utilize a Motivational Interviewing approach to substance use. Interns also conduct individual alcohol and drug assessments during the year and provide psychoeducation to campus groups. Interns are prepared for Alcohol and Drug counseling & Assessment during orientation, a regularly scheduled seminar held throughout the year, individual and group supervision, and weekly clinical consultation.

BIOFEEDBACK ROTATION-Optional

(Meeting schedule TBA with Biofeedback  supervisor)

Interns receive training and applied clinical experience in the theory and clinical application of selected biofeedback, anxiety and stress management techniques. Interns are prepared for biofeedback during orientation, a Biofeedback Seminar and (required) self-training.  The Biofeedback supervisor is available for ongoing consultation and supervision.

 

 

DIVERSITY TEAM PRESENTATION

 

 

Interns, faculty and staff work in Diversity Teams. Each team selects a diversity topic and prepares an educational presentation for all CTC staff once per year.

SUMMER PROJECT: INDIVIDUAL TRAINING EMPHASIS

(4hrs@week summer semester)

Each intern proposes and completes a summer professional development project. This is the primary opportunity that interns have to focus on an area of individual interest. Interns identify specific learning goals, activities and outcomes for the project.



TRAINING SEMINARS

Seminars

Meeting Schedule

 

Alcohol & Drug Use & Harm Reduction Seminar

Fall & Spring Semester

 

Clinical & Professional Topics Seminar

Meets year-round

 

Consultation & Outreach Seminar

Fall & Spring Semester

 

Diversity Seminar

Meets year-round

 

Testing & Assessment Seminar

Fall & Spring Semester

 

Supervision of Supervision Seminar

Fall & Spring Semester

 



TYPICAL WEEKLY INTERN SCHEDULE: FALL & SPRING SEMESTER

Direct Service

 

Initial Evaluation

4

Individual, Couples, Group Counseling

12

Crisis Intervention

1

Rotation (Psychiatric & CHOICES)

2

Supervision Given (of Practicum Students)

1.5

Outreach Presentations & Consultation (Average per Week)

.5

Psychological Testing (Average per Week)

1

TOTAL DIRECT SERVICE HOURS (variable)

22

 

 

Indirect Services:  Supervision Received

 

Individual Clinical Supervision

2

Group Supervision: Clinical

1

Group Supervision:  Supervision of Supervision

1

Group Supervision:  Psychiatric

1

Total Supervision Hours (fixed)

5

 

 

Indirect Service:  Intern Training

 

Clinical & Professional Topics Seminar

2

Testing &Assessment Seminar

2

Consultation & Outreach Seminar

1

Alcohol & Drug Seminar

1

Clinical Staff Meeting

1

Total Intern Training Hours (Less in spring & summer)

7

 

 

Indirect Service:  Administrative Tasks

 

Case Management/Report Writing

5

Professional Development/Scholarly Activities

1

Total Administrative Hours

6

 

 

TOTAL INDIRECT SERVICE HOURS

22

 

 

GRAND TOTAL*

(22 Direct Service hours + 18 Indirect Service hours=40 hours

40

 

 

*This represents an average.  Actual hours may vary.


 


 






INTERNSHIP TRAINING ACTIVITIES


Specific training activities including Orientation, Supervision, Consultation, Seminars, Training Rotations and Specializations, and Professional Development Activities. The internship program has been designed to provide training activities that follow a developmental sequence and  provide the necessary structure, guidance, and support to facilitate the development of each intern as he or she moves towards greater autonomy, and gains the skills, knowledge, and confidence to master increasingly complex tasks and decisions during the course of the training year.

 

ORIENTATION 

Interns arrive on campus 2 weeks prior to the start of classes. The first 2-4 weeks of the internship are designed to introduce the interns to the University of Idaho Counseling & Testing Center, and facilitate their transition to internship. During this time, interns learn about the philosophy and operating procedures of the CTC, meet the faculty and staff, and learn about other campus and community resources and referrals. In addition, interns attend a variety of intensive training seminars related to each of the core components. Each intern also develops learning goals, a supervision  contract and schedule in consultation with the Training Director and their individual supervisor. The interns and the Training Director also go on a mini-retreat at the beginning and end of the internship year. The primary goals of the retreat are to facilitate the development of collegial relationships, to set and review interests, goals, and the development of professional identity while in a relaxed setting.

SUPERVISION (5 hrs. @ week)

Individual Supervision (Received) 2 hours

Individual supervision is viewed as central to the internship experience and is at the core of transmitting knowledge, skill development, ethical guidelines, and facilitating the development of professional identity and personal growth.  The intern’s individual clinical supervisor serves as the primary mentor. However, all CTC faculty participate in the training program and serve as mentors to the interns. Interns meet with their individual supervisor weekly to discuss theories, models, ethics, and techniques of effective counseling, to discuss their own development as a psychologist, and to review individual cases and taped counseling sessions.  The functions of the supervisory relationship include monitoring client welfare, enhancing intern skills, promoting personal and professional growth and evaluating the intern's skills and professional development on a continuous basis.

Interns have the opportunity to work with a different primary supervisor each semester (fall, spring and summer semester) to experience more breadth and variety in the individual supervision experience through exposure to a variety of supervisory styles and mentorship. Both interns and supervisors have input into the decisions about supervisory matches. The Director of Training makes supervision assignments based on the intern's skill level, theoretical preferences, training needs, interests and personal characteristics, as well as the supervisory style and preferences of supervisors and interns.

Interns are required to record their counseling, assessment, and supervision sessions for review with their supervisors. Our faculty uses a consultative model of supervision; supervisors consult with one another about trainee development and progress on a regular basis.  The internship training program functions in a manner consistent with the American Psychological Association’s 2002 Ethical Standard 7.04 (Student Disclosure of Personal Information) as contained in the Revised Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA 2002).

 

Group Supervision, Clinical (1 hour @ wk.)

Interns meet with rotating faculty supervisors in weekly group supervision to discuss and review videotaped counseling sessions of their clinical cases, exchange ideas and feedback, and integrate theory and research with clinical practice. Interns take turns presenting clinical cases on a rotating basis.

Group Supervision: Psychiatric (1 hour @ wk.)

Interns and CTC faculty meet with the university psychiatrist to consult about clients referred for psychiatric services and broad issues of diagnosis, treatment and medication.

 

Group Supervision: Supervision of Supervision (1 hour @ wk.)

Interns meet with the Director of Training and the Coordinator of Practicum Training weekly to learn theories, models, ethics, and techniques of effective supervision, to discuss their own development as a supervisor and to review videotaped supervision sessions and discuss supervisee progress.

 

Supervision of Group Counseling  (.5 hour @ wk. as needed)

Interns meet with a faculty supervisor weekly for a minimum of 30 minutes when they are facilitating or co-facilitating a group to discuss theories, models, ethics, and techniques of effective group counseling, their own development as a group facilitator, and to review the specific elements of the group counseling sessions.  

 

  Staff Meeting (1 hr.@ week, alternate weeks)

Interns attend a meeting with all CTC faculty to discuss cases and clinical topics on an every other week basis. Interns and faculty take turns presenting cases. Interns are required to make a formal case presentation twice during the internship year, once each in fall and spring semester. The main goal for the intern case presentations is to allow interns the opportunity to gain experience making a formal case presentation to other professionals, discuss clinical issues with the group, and give and receive feedback. Interns receive written feedback from participants about their case presentations.

 

SEMINARS (5-6 hrs. @week fall, less in spring & summer semester)
  1. Multicultural & Diversity Seminar
  2. Outreach & Consultation Seminar
  3. Psychological Testing & Assessment Seminar
  4. Supervision of Supervision Seminar
  5. Substance Abuse Seminar
  6. Special Topics Seminar (Includes  Biofeedback Training, Clinical Topics, Ethics on a rotating basis)