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English Department

Physical Address:
200 Brink Hall

Mailing Address:
English Department
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1102
Moscow, Idaho 83844-1102

Phone: 208-885-6156

Fax: 208-885-5944

Email: englishdept@uidaho.edu

Web: English

Directory Map

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Summer Courses

Creative Writing Pedagogy
Instructor: Toby Wray
June 17 - 28, 8 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.


As successful as the discipline of Creative Writing has become, more diverse approaches are beginning to revitalize how we engage it in our classrooms. Creative Writing courses focused on the workshop have become ubiquitous in the U.S. In fact, the workshop model has been so central a concept it has become synonymous with the practice of writing instruction. Ironically, it is difficult to imagine a subject better suited or more inviting to innovative teaching strategies. This course undertakes a comparative study of Creative Writing pedagogies borrowing from Composition Studies and other fields, arriving at practical method of instruction that attend to the diversity of our student and the myriad possibilities that Creative Writing offers.

Learning Objectives

Expect rigor. The goals of this course will lead us to:

  • Examine Creative Writing classroom structures and approaches, both attempting to appreciate its prominence in the American classroom, as well as interrogate the workshop as the predominate model of its practice.
  • Identify the current theories surrounding Creative Writing pedagogy and apply these methods to working syllabi and lesson plans.
  • Participate effectively in class discussion, in engaged written response, and make well-supported claims about ideas we encounter during our time together.

Download the syllabus.

Greek and Roman Mythology
Instructor: Victoria Arthur
June 17-28, 11 a.m. to 1:50 p.m.


"It would not be to much to say that myth is the secret opening through which the inexhaustible energies of the cosmos pour into human cultural manifestation. Religions, philosophies, arts, the social forms of primitive and historic man, prime discoveries in science and technology, the very dreams that blister sleep, boil up from the basic, magic ring of myth"

(Campbell 3)

Ancient mythological characters and stories permeate our culture. According to Comparative Mythologist Joseph Campbell (quoted above), our need for myth hasn't waned with the development of civilization. It might be even greater now that we no longer have the cultural glue of religion to guide us through life and explain the mysteries of the universe. In fact, George Lucas created the Star Wars franchise to provide what he considers a myth for our age.

The source material for myth is vast, especially considering all of the different myths that have developed all over the world, so this course is focused specifically on Greek and Roman mythology in order to understand the impact of these texts on Western culture. We are going t start with the Greek version of creation and the Olympian pantheon through Hesiod and The Homeric Hymns. We will continue to explore the epic events of the Trojan War, the return of some of the heroes, and the founding of Rome in Homer and Virgil. We will wrap up with the stories of two cursed families through Greek drama. Throughout, we will be making connection to uses of these myths in literature and pop culture.

As we read this material, we will be asking questions like:

"What is myth?"

"What social and cultural purposes do myths serve?"

"Why do myth still engage and entertain us in our post-modern, scientific world?"

Download the syllabus.

The Grace Nixon Application Form

English Department

Physical Address:
200 Brink Hall

Mailing Address:
English Department
University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1102
Moscow, Idaho 83844-1102

Phone: 208-885-6156

Fax: 208-885-5944

Email: englishdept@uidaho.edu

Web: English

Directory Map