Kelvin Daniels, Occupational Safety Specialist
kelvind@uidaho.edu
phone: 208-885-6297
fax: 208-885-5969
Environmental Health & Safety
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2030
Moscow, ID 83844-2030

PSS Units

Environmental Health & Safety

Environmental Health and Safety
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2030
Moscow, ID 83844-2030
Phone: (208) 885-6524
Fax: (208) 885-5969
Email

Public Safety & Security

Public Safety and Security
875 Perimeter Dr MS 3162 
Moscow, ID 83844-3162
Phone: (208) 885-2254
Fax: (208) 885-9490

Emergency Management

Emergency Management
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2281
Moscow, ID 83844-2281
Phone: (208) 885-7209
Fax: (208) 885-7001
Email

Active in Emergencies
(208) 885-1010

Risk Management & Insurance

Risk Management & Insurance
875 Perimeter Dr MS 3162
Moscow, ID 83844-3162 
Phone: (208) 885-7177
Fax: (208) 885-9490
Email

Active in Emergencies
(208) 885-1010

Security Services

Security Services
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2281
Moscow, ID 83844-2281
Phone: (208) 885-7054
Fax: (208) 885-7001
Email

Basic Safety Rules

The Basics of Safety

Through several years of investigating accidents and research in the field of accident reconstruction, leaders in the field of occupational accident prevention have concluded that there are specific reasons why accidents occur. They found that worker safety is dependent on worker behavior and human factors. They developed ten safety rules and, while many of you may have heard them before, they are worth repeating:


  1. STAY ALERT - and stay alive. The more awake a worker is, the less likely he or she is to get hurt. If you are unsure how to operate equipment or perform a task, ask your supervisor. Don't guess and muddle through. Make sure you know in advance the correct, safe way to do it.
  2. WEAR THE RIGHT CLOTHES - work clothes should fit properly. Anything that can catch in machinery or trip you up is hazardous. Wear protective clothing and equipment as required.
  3. USE THE RIGHT TOOLS - if you need a hammer, get a hammer. It may be handier to use a pair of pliers, wrench or screw driver, but you are more likely to get injured.
  4. LEARN HOW TO LIFT - Lifting takes more than muscle; it is an art. Don't try to show how strong you are; you may end up in a hospital. Get help to handle anything that is too heavy or cumbersome for you.
  5. DON'T BE A PRANKSTER - practical jokes and horseplay can be dangerous, especially around heavy machinery. If you feel the urge to play, resist it until after work.
  6. BE TIDY - Good housekeeping reduces hazards in the workplace or your home. Always put away tools when they are not in use. Keep the floors clean, pick up scraps and wipe up spills. A slip or trip can be fatal.
  7. REPORTING IS IMPORTANT - Never fail to report accidents, defective equipment and or unsafe conditions.
  8. GET FIRST AID IMMEDIATELY - if you're hurt - even if it seems minor. Neglect of an injury may lead to serious infection, weeks of lost time, and possibly permanent injury.
  9. BACK YOUR SAFETY PROGRAM - If you have an idea you believe will reduce accidents, tell your supervisor about it. Set an example by obeying safety rules. Cooperate with your safety committee.
  10. NEVER TAKE A CHANCE - Next to sheer carelessness, short cuts are probably the biggest killer of all. To save a minute or two, you may lose a lifetime. Whatever you are doing, if you are not doing it safely, you are not doing it right!

 

Excerpted with permission from Utah Safety Council Newsletter, August 2010

 

If you have questions about the specific safe work practices and procedures that apply to your work activities, please be sure to bring them to the attention of your supervisor.  For additional information, please call Environmental Health and Safety, (208) 885-6524.