Tom Hicks, Hazardous Materials Specialist
thicks@uidaho.edu
phone: 208-885-2883
fax: 208-885-5969
Environmental Health & Safety
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2030
Moscow, ID 83844-2030
Mark Borth, Hazardous Materials Technician II
borth@uidaho.edu
phone: 208-885-6279
fax: 208-885-5969
Environmental Health & Safety
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2030
Moscow, ID 83844-2030

PSS Units

EHS

Environmental Health and Safety
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2030
Moscow, ID 83844-2030
Phone: (208) 885-6524
Fax: (208) 885-5969
Email

PSS

Public Safety and Security
875 Perimeter Dr MS 3162 
Moscow, ID 83844-3162
Phone: (208) 885-2254
Fax: (208) 885-9490

Emergency Mgmt

Emergency Management
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2281
Moscow, ID 83844-2281
Phone: (208) 885-7179
Fax: (208) 885-7001
Email

Active in Emergencies
(208) 885-1010

Risk Management

Risk Management & Insurance
875 Perimeter Dr MS 3162
Moscow, ID 83844-3162 
Phone: (208) 885-7177
Fax: (208) 885-9490
Email

Active in Emergencies
(208) 885-1010

Security Services

Security Services
875 Perimeter Dr MS 2281
Moscow, ID 83844-2281
Phone: (208) 885-7054
Fax: (208) 885-7001
Email

PCB Management

What we do

Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) coordinates the management and disposal of PCBs and PCB articles that are found on campus.  EHS works closely with Facilities Services to identify PCB sources, remove these sources, and respond to potential spills.

How you can help

Older fluorescent light ballasts are the most common source of PCBs on the University of Idaho campus.  Ballasts manufactured before July 1, 1979 may contain PCBs.  Ballasts manufactured between July 1, 1978 and July 1, 1998 that do not contain PCBs must be labeled "No PCBs".

Be alert to other potential sources of PCBs.  Know how to handle potential PCB sources and how to respond to spills of potential PCB material.

Contact EHS if you have any questions or concerns about potential PCB items.

What are PCBs?

Polychlorinated biphenyls (or PCBs) are a group of colorless oils which were used extensively during the 50's, 60's and 70's in applications requiring highly stable oils possessing low conductivity and flammability properties.  PCBs were used extensively in capacitors, transformers and heat transfer systems.  PCBs were also used in vacuum pumps, hydraulic fluids, plasticizers, fire retardants, wax extenders, dusting removal agents, pesticide extenders, inks, lubricants, cutting oils, and in carbonless reproducing paper.

Because of their toxicity and persistence in the environment, the domestic production of PCBs was banned in 1977.  Toxic effects in humans include chloracne, pigmentation of the skin and nails, excessive eye discharge, swelling of the eyelids, distinctive hair follicles and gastrointestinal disturbances.  PCBs are listed as a carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  PCBs and PCB containing articles are regulated by the EPA under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) and are not regulated as a hazardous waste.  The PCB regulations, under TSCA, regulate the disposal of PCB articles (and PCBs) and regulate the cleanup of PCBs when released into the environment.