New Indicators Website a One-Stop Shop for Idaho County and Reservation Data

Tuesday, June 18 2013


MOSCOW, Idaho – Aiming to take the hard work out of finding and analyzing state and federal data for Idaho a new website, developed by University of Idaho’s Office of Community Partnerships (OCP), offers up-to-date socioeconomic data for Idaho’s counties and Native American reservations to help understand community characteristics and trends.

At a time when finding reliable data on the Internet can be overwhelming, Indicators Idaho, www.indicatorsidaho.org, presents a user-friendly source of data for Idaho’s communities.

“Local residents, businesses, and community leaders need accurate data quickly for grant proposals, program development, and identifying business opportunities,” said Priscilla Salant, director of OCP. “Our goal is to help people find reliable, timely information quickly and without difficulty.”

With little knowledge of government data sets, website users can answer questions about population, education, employment, health insurance coverage and other topics important to local well-being.

New data from federal and state sources are posted on Indicators Idaho immediately after release. The website presents data for 47 county and 11 reservation indicators, including unemployment, wages, household income, educational attainment, poverty, crime, teenage pregnancy, housing affordability and more. Data come from a variety of government agencies, including the Census Bureau, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Labor.

“Our website makes data collection simple,” said Christy Dearien, the website’s manager and a research associate at OCP. “Rather than searching through multiple government websites, people can use Indicators Idaho to easily access data on a wide range of topics.”

The website’s target audience includes grant writers, local decision-makers, nonprofits, educators and students, among others.

Those needing more in-depth information to answer specific questions can hire OCP to gather, analyze and present data.

“We came to OCP with a list of data questions, and they were able to provide a response that was timely, accurate and affordable,” said Harriet Shaklee, a University of Idaho Extension specialist located in Boise. “This is an opportunity to put your data questions in the hands of real pros.”

OCP recently prepared a series of data and reports for topics of interest to the Bonner Boundary Priority Planning project in northern Idaho. The group used the information to focus in on top community priorities related to economic development and education.

In addition to providing easy access to data, OCP also combines data from Indicators Idaho with data from other sources to create the “Idaho at a Glance” series. This series of research briefs addresses critical policy issues in Idaho and provides information in a clear and concise format. Topics include rural education, Idaho’s Hispanic population, telecommunications and the recession in rural Idaho. The “Idaho at a Glance” series is available at: www.uidaho.edu/IdahoataGlance.

“The ‘Idaho at a Glance’ reports have been the most valuable tool in helping educate our constituents both in and out of state on critical issues affecting our Hispanic population. There continues to be a strong demand for the reports,” said Margie Gonzalez, executive director of the Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs.

Please contact Christy Dearien at cdearien@uidaho.edu to learn more about the Indicators Idaho website, “Idaho at a Glance” or community indicators in Idaho.

Find out more online: www.uidaho.edu/communitypartnerships.
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About the University of Idaho

The University of Idaho inspires students to succeed and become leaders. Its land-grant mission furthers innovative scholarly and creative research to grow Idaho's economy and serve a statewide community. From its main campus in Moscow, Idaho, to 70 research and academic locations statewide, U-Idaho emphasizes real-world application as part of its student experience. U-Idaho combines the strength of a large university with the intimacy of small learning communities. It is home to the Vandals and competes in the Big Sky Conference. Through the university’s $225 million Inspiring Futures capital campaign, private giving will enhance student learning, faculty research and innovation, and a spirit of enterprise. For information, visit www.uidaho.edu.



About the University of Idaho
The University of Idaho helps students to succeed and become leaders. Its land-grant mission furthers innovative scholarly and creative research to grow Idaho's economy and serve a statewide community. From its main campus in Moscow, Idaho, to 70 research and academic locations statewide, U-Idaho emphasizes real-world application as part of its student experience. U-Idaho combines the strength of a large university with the intimacy of small learning communities. It is home to the Vandals. For information, visit www.uidaho.edu.