HR Units

Human Resources

Office Location
415 West 6th Street
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4332
Moscow, ID 83844-4332
Phone: (208) 885-3609
Fax: (208) 885-3602

General Email

Department Phone List

Employment Services

Office Location
415 West 6th Street
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4332
Moscow, ID 83844-4332
Phone: (208) 885-3609
Fax: (208) 885-3602

General Email

Department Phone List

Payroll Services

Office Location
415 West 6th Street
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4332
Moscow, ID 83844-4332
Phone: (208) 885-3609
Fax: (208) 885-3864

General Email

Department Phone List

Benefits Services

Office Location
415 West 6th Street
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4332
Moscow, ID 83844-4332
Phone: (208) 885-3697
Fax: (800) 646-6174

General Email

Department Phone List

PDL

Office Location
Administration Building
Room 216 - 220
875 Perimeter Drive MS 3166
Moscow, ID 83844-3166

Phone: (208) 885-2322
General Email

Market Analysis and Compensation

Updated September 5, 2013

Please check back frequently, as responses to many of the questions will expand as additional information becomes available. We expect to add new questions approximately twice a week. Please use the online feedback/questions form to continue contributing to this study.

  • Where was the market data collected from?

    Exempt – sought national data from CUPA HR surveys – picked institutions $175 million - $525 million.  We are in the process of tracking down this list of Universities.  Watch the website for more information soon.

    Classified – Towers and Mercer surveys to capture local and regional data

  • Please describe the new compensation tables, i.e. what is the first quartile?
    We added the first quartile, which is one quarter of the way through the range.  We also added a column for one third through range. There is a minimum, midpoint and maximum in the new tables just as there are in our current titles.
  • What accounts for the broad classifications/salary ranges for similar positions?
    We had not done a comprehensive review of positions for a long time. Job descriptions were out of date. The classification study was conducted, in part to update job information, conduct an analysis and identify and group positions performing similar levels of work.    The breadth of the actual pay ranges is common to most systems and not particularly different than our current system.
  • Is the new pay table tied to a time table in longevity?
    It is not tied to longevity. Individuals will have different levels of years of service.
  • How did you derive pay ranges for benchmarked jobs? How did you use the market to get these numbers?
    Sibson Consulting compared the benchmarked jobs to the relevant labor markets.  Each job had one or more matches that included the median or market salary.  The match to those positions gave Sibson the data necessary to slot the benchmarked jobs into individual grades.
  • Was private industry used in determining market?
    Yes for the local/regional surveys.
  • Will there be or has there been any consideration of cost of living and fair market salary structure based on geography?
    The market study included regional salary data, so geography was taken into account in the market analysis.  University leadership is aware of the relationship of our salaries to the market and is working toward moving our staff and faculty wages up over time.
  • Was the State of Idaho employee pay scale looked at when considering “Market Value?” If no, why not?
    If the State of Idaho responded to the Towers or the Mercer surveys, those wage rates would have been included in the market analysis.
  • Why is there no pay difference between an administrative coordinator and a specialist? If your pay is lower than someone with a grade two levels below you will it be adjusted?
    The level of work for the positions in those two classifications was determined to be the same through the classification study.  The only pay adjustments in the near future will be to move those below the minimums of the pay ranges up to the minimum.
  • How will I move up the salary range?

    Permanent moves within a specific salary range can occur in one of three ways:

    1. An across the board increase as determined by the University
        2. A salary compression or other equity-related increase.

    3)      3. A merit pay increase

    In moving away from the Hay Point system, reclassifications can only occur when a job change is significant enough to warrant moving to a higher pay grade.  Note: the wage rate or salary will not change if an employee moves to a new job in the same pay range.

  • Will I get a pay increase when the system is implemented?

    Employees whose pay rate is below the minimum of the new pay ranges will be brought up to the minimum of the range.

  • If I am above the maximum of the salary range, will I receive a pay raise again?

    The principle behind the salary ranges are that the spread between the minimum and the maximum indicate the value of a position.  HR urges everyone to understand this is not about an individual contributor or his or her value.  It is only about the value that the institution places on the position itself.  Employees above the maximum will continue to be eligible for merit and CEC pay increases. 

  • My FLSA exempt staff are asked to perform more complex and higher level work and may work extra hours. Was this taken into account in the classification decision?

    FLSA exempt positions are often asked to perform more complex work.  This was taken into account during the classification study based on the information provided in the position description questionnaires.

    The question of overtime pay has no bearing on a position classification.  It is a legal issue under FLSA and a budget issue for a department, both unrelated to position classifications.

  • My employee (supervisee) is FLSA exempt and desires more money. How can I get them more money?

    Classification or re-classifications are not related to and should not be used to reward strong performers or retain people who may be looking for other work.  An institution needs good pay practices and guidelines to deal with this type of situation outside of a reclassification process.  A strong performance management system and merit pay are also used for these purposes.

    University leaders continue to discuss and will build in more options and flexibility as compensation dollars become available and the University resolves some if its current compensation challenges.

    Although re-classifications should not be used to reward people, if a job has changed significantly and merits a different compensation grade, the reclassification (link to re-classifications) process may be appropriate.

  • My salary is at the minimum of the new range but I have been here 5 years. Will brand new people be hired into this grade at higher pay?

    This is a good example of salary compression.  University leadership is sensitive to this issue and is putting practices in place to minimize making the salary compression worse.  Leadership is also developing a long-term plan to reduce salary compression among current staff.

  • What is a “benchmark” job?

    Benchmark jobs are those that have a substantial portion of their work that is comparable to positions found at other higher education institutions or other organizations. This allows us to compare the pay for a given job or group of jobs.

  • What is a compensation study?

    A compensations study involves a review of our freshly revised job classifications to determine a fair and competitive salary range.  This analysis is based on both a review of comparable market survey data as well as a review of internal salary relationships between jobs.

    We should note that the primary motivation for these projects is to create a sustainable, fair and understandable classification and compensation program.  The revised program will allow us to do a compensation study based on up-to-date position information (from the PDQ).

  • Will this compensation study factor in non-salary benefits?

    Not in a formal way.  The University is always aware of the value of our compensation programs but the market survey conducted will focus on wages.  Considering non-salary benefits like retirement, health benefits, leave accruals and tuition benefits do play a role in the University’s decision on how close to “market” we want to be with our wage rates.  Non-salary benefits are not surveyed.

  • Will I be reclassified or get more money?

    We will have new classifications and new salary ranges and may have new classification titles.  It is too early to predict what will happen to any individual’s salary regarding increases.

    What should be evident is that we have made our best effort to classify positions correctly.  This will reduce the instances where two employees performing work at similar levels are in different pay ranges and earning different wage rates.  This does not mean individual employees will receive pay increases or pay reductions specifically to correct the imbalances but it will mean, over time, these situations will even out. 

    Another benefit will be the University’s plan to address the compensation-related issues brought out by the classification study.  We should develop a multi-year plan that is consistent with the results and our resulting compensation philosophy.

  • Will my pay go down?

    No.  If an employee’s salary is above the maximum of the range, salary may be frozen until the salary range catches up.  This process is still being analyzed and will be determined prior to implementation.

  • What is salary compression?

    Salary compression occurs in a number of ways.  One common cause is a new employee earning close to or more than a long-term employee doing similar work, or an employee making close to what their supervisor makes.  Another cause is not having the funding to move employees through a salary range or the salary range changing at about the same rate the employees move through it.  This causes the same situation described above.

    There are a number of solutions to salary compression issues.  These studies will point these out to us.  Please know that they do matter because these are the most common “internal equity” problems.  It is likely that the University will have multiple issues to address with limited compensation dollars so we will have to prioritize the fixes. This analysis will be conducted primarily by Human Resources and the budget director.   This subsequent plan should help us all understand those priorities.