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Moscow

Work-Study Assistance
finaid-workstudy@uidaho.edu  
Phone: (208) 885-6312
Toll Free: (888) 884-3246
Fax: (208) 885-5592
Student Union Building 101
875 Perimeter Dr MS 4291
Moscow, ID 83844-4291
Office Hours: 9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.*

Federal Work-Study Community Service

MAJOR FEDERAL WORK-STUDY (FWS) PROGRAM CHANGES FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITIES PROVIDED FOR IN THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED BY THE HIGHER EDUCATION AMENDMENTS OF 1992 AND THE HIGHER EDUCATION TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS OF 1993 (AMENDED HEA).

Program Purpose

The purpose of the FWS Program was amended to include an encouragement to students receiving program assistance to participate in community service activities.

Community Services Definition

The definition of "community services" was amended to read: services which are identified by an institution of higher education, through formal or informal consultation with local nonprofit, governmental, and community-based organizations, as designed to improve the quality of life for community residents, particularly low-income individuals, or to solve particular problems related to their needs, including

  1. Such fields as health care, child care, literacy training, education (including tutorial services), welfare, social services, transportation, housing and neighborhood improvement, public safety, crime prevention and control, recreation, rural development, and community improvement;
  2. Work in service opportunities or youth corps as defined in section 101(*) of the National and Community Services Act of 1990, and services in the agencies, institutions and activities designated in section 124 (a) [**] of the National and Community Services Act of 1990;
  3. Support services to students with disabilities
  4. Activities in which a student serves as a mentor for such purposes as
    • Tutoring
    • Supporting educational and recreational activities
    • Counseling, including career counseling

Section 101 of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 defines the terms "service opportunity" and "youth corps program" as follows:

  1. Service opportunity - a program or project, including service learning programs or projects, that enables students or out-of-school youth to perform meaningful and constructive service in agencies, institutions, and situations where the application of human talent and dedication may help to meet human, educational, linguistic, and environmental community needs, especially those relating to poverty.
  2. Youth corps program - a program, such as a conservation corps or youth service program, that offers full-time, productive work (to be financed through stipends) with visible community benefits, in a natural resource or human service setting and that gives participants a mix of work experience, basic and life skills, education, training, and support services.

Section 124(a) of the National and Community Service Act (NASA) of 1990 provides the following list of agencies, institutions, and activities that:

  1. In the case of conservation corps programs, focus on 
    • Conservation, rehabilitation, and the improvement of wildlife habitat, rangelands, parks, and recreation areas
    • Urban and rural revitalization, historical and site preservation, and reforestation of both urban and rural areas
    • Fish culture, wildlife habitat maintenance and improvement, and other fishery assistance
    • Road and trail maintenance and improvement
    • Erosion, flood drought, and storm damage assistance and controls
    • Stream, lake, waterfront harbor, and port improvement
    • Wetlands protection and pollution control
    • Insect, disease, rodent, and fire prevention and control
    • The improvement of abandoned railroad beds and rights-of-way
    • Energy conservation projects, renewable resource enhancement, and recovery of biomass
    • Reclamation and improvement of strip-mined land
    • Forestry, nursery, and cultural operations
    • Making public facilities accessible to individuals with disabilities.
  2. In the case of human services corps programs, include participant service in
    • State, local, and regional governmental agencies
    • Nursing homes, hospices, senior centers, hospitals, local libraries, parks, recreational facilities, child and adult day care centers, programs serving individuals with disabilities, and schools
    • Law enforcement agencies, and penal and probation systems
    • Private nonprofit organizations that primarily focus on social service such as community action agencies
    • Activities that focus on the rehabilitation or improvement of public facilities, neighborhood improvements, literacy training that benefits educationally disadvantaged individuals, weatherization of and basic repairs to low-income housing including housing occupied by older adults, energy conservation (including solar energy techniques), removal of architectural barriers to access by individuals with disabilities to public facilities, activities that focus on drug and alcohol abuse education, prevention and treatment, and conservation, maintenance, or restoration of natural resources on publicly held lands
    • Any other nonpartisan civic activities and services that the Commission determines to be of a substantial social benefit in meeting unmet human, educational, or environmental needs (particularly needs related to poverty) or in the community where volunteer service is to be performed; or
  3. Encompass the focuses and services described in both paragraphs (1) and (2).