old growth

Meet The Teams

The Office of Community Partnerships recruited an interdisciplinary group of researchers from the University of Idaho’s College of Business and Economics, the Departments of Forest, Fire and Rangeland Sciences and the Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. Project work was divided into four teams: Community Outreach, Simulation/Modeling, Re-gional Optimization, and Economic Impact.
  • Community Outreach Team
    The community outreach team will first gather input from regional stakeholders to better understand the economic and political context for biofuel de-velopment. Community expertise will help guide researchers as they develop scenarios in-volving harvest, processing and transportation options for use in mathematical models and simulations. These scenarios will address community and industry priorities and help local, state and regional stakeholders make informed decisions. Additionally, an advisory board will provide local and regional perspective, help interpret and disseminate research results.

    Darin Saul dsaul@uidaho.edu (Office of Community Partnerships)
    Priscilla
    Darin Saul is the Associate Director of the Office of Community Partnerships. Previously he was the Sustainability Director and Director of the Sustainability Center at University of Idaho. Before coming to Idaho, he worked at Washington State University in positions related to sustainability and environmental education, and was the owner and director of Ecovista, an ecological research and planning company. He has a Ph.D. in English Literature from Washington State University.


    Priscilla Salant psalant@uidaho.edu (McClure Center)
    Priscilla
    Priscilla’s responsibility is to support university partnerships with communities, non-profit organizations, and public agencies throughout Idaho. She has over 20 years of experience building connections between universities and their statewide constituents, with a focus on rural economic development. Priscilla’s books include How to Conduct Your Own Survey (with Don Dillman), Guide to Rural Data (with Anita Waller), and Small Towns, Big Picture.


    Soren Newman newman@uidaho.edu (Office of Community Partnerships)
    Soren Newman
    Soren is a research associate for the Office of Community Partnerships. Soren earned her Ph.D. in Environmental and Natural Resource Science from Washington State University in 2013 with a focus on natural resource sociology, community sociology, and social science research methods. Soren’s research has examined communities’ responses to water privatization as well as capacity to adapt to environmental hazards, such as wildfire. Soren has Bachelors’ degrees in Spanish and Sociology from the University of Idaho and an M.A. in Sociology from Washington State University. From a grain farm near Orofino, Idaho, Soren loves adventuring outdoors, gardening, and learning about native plants.


    Debbie Gray dgray@uidaho.edu (Office of Community Partnerships)
    debbie gray
    Debbie’s passion is linking the university with Idaho communities, pairing student energy and knowledge with community needs. Since 2004, Debbie has coordinated over $5 million in grants, including the Northwest Area Foundation’s Horizons Leadership and Poverty Reduction program in 49 Idaho communities. Debbie contributes to the Idaho at a Glance series and creates maps for the Indicators Northwest website. She grew up on a wheat farm/cattle ranch in southeastern Idaho and obtained an M.S. in Environmental Science—Policy and Law from UI.


    Sue Potter spotter@uidaho.edu (Office of Community Partnerships)
    Sue Potter
    Sue has been at the University of Idaho intermittently for nearly twenty years. She has recently landed at OCP as the Financial Manager. She graduated from Northwest Nazarene University with a degree in Business. She has lived abroad and traveled internationally. She is active in the Mitochondrial Research Guild at Seattle Children’s Hospital and volunteers as treasurer for her local church and food bank. Sue keeps busy tracking her husband and sons’ activities, and minding her youngest son’s health and schooling.

    Research Questions

    • What do people in rural communities understand about bioenergy development options? What are their self-expressed information needs? 
    • What do they want to know? What do people in rural communities think about different scenarios involving harvest, processing and transportation? 
    • What are the benefits and tradeoffs for different scenarios? 
    • What do they see as opportunities and obstacles involved with using woody biomass for a renewable energy source?
  • Simulation and Modeling Team
    The Simulation and Modeling Team will develop a model to determine the overall viability and profitability of bioenergy strategies for woody biomass from the community perspective. Models will map each scenario from source to point of sale, estimate the number of jobs created and other potential benefits of each scenario, and variables such as transportation options, potential processing facility locations.

    Rob Keefe robk@uidaho.edu (Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sciences)

    Rob Keefe
     I grew up in New England (B.S.F., UNH) and migrated West. I have worked intermittently as a graduate researcher, consulting forester, and forest biometrician. I have enjoyed working in and around forestry in the Northeast and Northwestern United States, and have had a range of experiences with small private landowners and industry. My background in silviculture, forest biometrics, and modeling has ultimately led me to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the underlying importance of forest operations for forest management planning.

     
    Scott Metlen metlen@uidaho.edu (Department of Business and Economics)

    Scott Metlen
    Areas of Expertise: management of quality, organizational structure, and process and product management

    Awards and Honors:

    • Alumni Association Award for Excellence 2011 
    • Faculty Excellence Award, Naval Officer Education Program 2011 
    • Alumni Association Award for Excellence 2009 
    • Outstanding and Dedicated Service, Ag. Personnel Management Assoc. 
    • First Interstate Bank Student Excellence Award in the College of Business and Economics Excellence in Teaching 2008-2009 
    • First Interstate Bank Student Excellence Award in the College of Business and Economics Excellence in Advising 2007-2008 
    Education:
    University of Utah, Ph.D.
    California State University, MBA
    Oregon State University, BS


    Ryan Jacobson jaco0707@vandals.uidaho.edu (Department of Forest, Rangeland and Fire Sci grad student)
    Ryan Jacobson
    While growing up in southern Idaho, I spent most of my time fishing, hunting, whitewater rafting and playing sports. I have had an interest in the outdoors since I was very young, whether it was simply using the outdoors or trying to understand and improve them. I earned my B.S. in Geology from the University of Wyoming and am hoping to continue to improve my knowledge of natural systems with the AFRI grant focusing on developing and improving the use of forestry biomass in the Northwest.


    Research Questions

    • How does biofuel development fit in the Northern Rocky Mountains unique geography and economy?
    • Which production technologies and related supply configuration would have the greatest economic development potential from a regional and national perspective?
    • What are benefits and tradeoffs of different bioenergy development scenarios in the study area? How will the benefits and tradeoffs be distributed among communities in the study area?
    • Are perspectives from different scales—national, regional and community--consistent and if not, can they be reconciled?
    • Are there other high value uses of this feedstock that could benefit if lower cost biomass production and transportation was developed? 
    • Are there other value-added processing and production operations which would benefit from development of regional aviation biofuels industry?
    • How will demand created by the development of a liquid biofuel industry impact woody biomass value? Will it push the value of the commodity above the cost of bringing it to market? 
    • If the value increases above the cost of bringing it to market, how will this impact the industries already established in the study area that use woody biomass?
  • Regional Optimization Modeling Team
    The Regional Optimization Modeling team will assess the feasibility of various options for bioenergy production using woody biomass. The team will develop a nonlinear optimization model to evaluate scenario us using different production technologies, varying fuel product pricing, varying levels of production subsidies. Analysis will determine which scenario will produce bioenergy for the least cost and most profitability.

    Stephen Devadoss sdevadoss@uidaho.edu (Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Socialogy)
    Stephen Devadoss
    Ph.D., Economics, Iowa State University, 1985.

    Areas of teaching interest include mathematical economics, microeconomics, macroeconomics, dynamic optimization, international trade, and general equilibrium modeling. Areas of research specialization cover agricultural trade and policy, macroeconomics of agriculture, marketing, and production economics. Current research covers impacts of global and regional trade reforms on agriculture, imperfect competition and trade, partial and general equilibrium analyses of policies, exchange rate effects, game theory and trade, immigration and agriculture, and biofuel policies.

    Eli Kosse (Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology graduate student)
    Eli Kosse

    Research Questions:

    • Research Questions: How does biofuel development fit in the Northern Rocky Mountains unique geography and economy? Which production technologies and related supply configuration would have the greatest economic development potential from a regional and national perspective? 
    • What are benefits and tradeoffs of different bioenergy development scenarios in the study area? How will the benefits and tradeoffs be distributed among communities in the study area?
    • Are perspectives from different scales—national, regional and community--consistent and if not, can they be reconciled?
    • What is the optimal amount of woody biomass feedstock that can feed into a regional liquid biofuel industry that optimizes benefits for the study area?
    • Are there other high value uses of this feedstock that could benefit if lower cost biomass production and transportation was developed? Are there other value-added processing and production operations which would benefit from development of regional aviation biofuels industry?
    • How will demand created by the development of a liquid biofuel industry impact woody biomass value?
    • Will it push the value of the commodity above the cost of bringing it to market?
    • If the value increases above the cost of bringing it to market, how will this impact the industries already established in the study area that use woody biomass?
  • Economic Impact Team
    The Economic Impacts Team will analyze the regional and local economic impacts of the alternative scenarios and methods of alternative bioenergy production using woody biomass.  Researchers will use the following methods:
    • Identify potential sub-regions of bio-energy harvest, production, and distribution.
    • Develop a base assessment to identify drivers of the regional economy.
    • Examine how incomes will be affected by biofuels development (social accounting matrix (SAM) input/output model).
    • Forecast potential effects of biofuel development on local economies using the input/output model.
    • Compare benefits and tradeoffs of each production method.

    Steve Peterson stevenp@uidaho.edu (College of Business and Economics)

    Steven Peterson
    Research Interests:
    Input/out modeling, economic impact assessments, regional and local economic analysis, economics of education, natural resource economics.

    Education:
    M.S., Economics, University of Idaho
    B.S., Business Administration, Lewis and Clark State College





    Research Questions:

    • How will development of a regional liquid biofuel industry benefit and impact rural communities in the study area?
    • What are the distributional effects on incomes from biofuel development?
    • How will demand created by the development of a liquid biofuel industry impact woody biomass value?  Will it push the value of the commodity above the cost of bringing it to market?  If the value increases above the cost of bringing it to market, how will this impact the industries already established in the study area that use woody biomass?