“Other graduate programs I pursued did not offer this level of interdisciplinarity, and I feel this is where the future of scientific research is headed.”

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College of Natural Resources
phone: (208) 885-8981
toll free: 88-88-UIDAHO
fax: (208) 885-5534

875 Perimeter Drive MS 1142
Moscow, ID 83844-1142
Zion Klos (red shorts) conducts field research at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southern Idaho. Photo by Tim Link.

Meet Zion Klos

By Sue McMurray

Year: First year doctoral student
Program: Forest Resources/IGERT
Hometown: Brillion, Wisc.

Zion Klos, a highly recruited doctoral student who turned down Stanford to study within the University of Idaho, is one of two Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship Program (IGERT) students to receive a highly competitive National Science Foundation (NSF) graduate research fellowship. For three years, Klos will receive NSF funding that includes:

  • $30,000 annual stipend
  • $10,500 cost-of-education allowance
  • International research and professional development opportunities
  • TeraGrid Supercomputer access

IGERT is the NSF’s flagship interdisciplinary training program, educating U.S. doctoral scientists and engineers by building on the foundations of their disciplinary knowledge with interdisciplinary training.

“Other graduate programs I pursued did not offer this level of interdisciplinarity, and I feel this is where the future of scientific research is headed,” says Klos.

NSF Fellows are expected to become knowledge experts who can contribute significantly to research, teaching and innovations in science and engineering.

Klos plans to meet this expectation by earning a doctoral degree in natural resources. His graduate project will quantify the effect wetter springs and dryer, longer summers will have on stream flow and the availability of water in surface versus subsurface reservoirs.

His research will help predict how both water availability and flood risk will be affected in the future by several factors, including precipitation changes, shifting human populations, and changing hill slope vegetation. Currently he is part of a three-member team that will address these issues in the Northern Rockies.

“Hopefully, through my disciplinary research and the combined efforts of the Northern Rockies Team, we can help communities, both social and ecological, adapt to changing climate in a way that maximizes their wellbeing and happiness into the future,” he said.