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Contact Us

Moscow

Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
frfs@uidaho.edu

College of Natural Resources

phone: (208) 885-7952
fax: (208) 885-6564

875 Perimeter Drive MS 1133
Moscow, ID 83844-1133
Amanda Gearhart, Rangeland Extension Specialist

Amanda Gearhart


Office: Twin Falls Research and Extension Center; Evergreen Building 49B
Phone: (208) 736-3610
Email: amandag@uidaho.edu
Mailing Address: Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1133
Moscow, Idaho 83844-1133

College of Natural Resources
Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Sciences
Rangeland Extension Specialist / Assistant Professor

Home Town: Prineville, Oregon
Campus Locations: Twin Falls Research and Extension Center, Twin Falls
With UI Since 2012


  • Research/Focus Areas
    • Rangeland management
    • rangeland monitoring
    • GIS
    • remote sensing
    • landscape ecology
    • state and transition models
    • habitat assessment
  • Biography

    Amanda Gearhart is a Rangeland Extension Specialist and Assistant Professor of Forest, Rangeland, and Fire Science with the University of Idaho.  Her extension and research responsibilities are focused on rangeland monitoring, the use of geospatial technologies in rangeland management, and rangeland management at a landscape scale.

    Amanda was born and raised in central Oregon.  She earned her B.S. from Oregon State University, M.S. in Rangeland Ecology and Management from University of Idaho, and Ph.D. in Range Science from North Dakota State University.  She returned to the University of Idaho in August 2012 after working as a post-doctoral research scientist for the USDA-Agricultural Research Service.  Her office is in the Twin Falls Research and Extension Center.
  • Selected Publications

    Gearhart, A.L., T.J. Svejcar, and P.L. Shaver. In pre-submission review. Diversity of opinions relating to practical use of state and transition models. Rangelands

    Gearhart, A.L., M. Doverspike, and T.J. Svejcar. Submitted. Puzzle pieces: A case study of remote sensing and grazing management on an Oregon creek. Rangelands.

    Gearhart, A.L., D.T. Booth, K.K. Sedivec, and C.S. Schauer.  2012. Use of Kendall’s coefficient of concordance to assess agreement among observers of very high resolution imagery. Geocarto International.

    Gearhart, A.L. 2011. Comparison of very large scale aerial imagery to ground-based rangeland monitoring methods in the northern mixed prairie [dissertation]. Fargo, ND, USA: North Dakota State University. 122 p.

    Sedivec, K., A. Gearhart, D. Vannurden, M. Doyle, J. Peterson, M. Humann, J. Peterson. 2010. Range judging handbook for North Dakota. 4th Edition. North Dakota State University Extension Service, Fargo, ND. 60 pp.

    Sedivec, K., D. Vannurden, M. Doyle, M. Humann, D. Froemke, J. Peterson, and A. Gearhart. 2008. Range judging handbook for North Dakota. 3rd Edition.  North Dakota State University Extension Service, Fargo, ND. 60 pp.

    Hancock, A.L., E.K. Strand, K.L. Launchbaugh. 2007. Wish upon a satellite: Applying GPS to rangeland management. Rangelands 29:51-56.

    Sedivec, K., D. Vannurden, M. Doyle, M. Humann, D. Froemke, J. Peterson, and A. Hancock.  2007.  Range judging handbook for North Dakota.  2nd Edition.  North Dakota State University Extension Service, Fargo, ND.  58 pp.
  • Research Projects

    Comparison of multiple historical monitoring methods across five rangeland biomes

    Lemmon, South Dakota, Nunn, Colorado, Elko, Nevada, Burns, Oregon, Portola, California

    Collected data on historical rangeland monitoring transects using loop frequency, line point intercept, Daubenmire frames, nested density/frequency, and biomass methods.  Methods will be compared to assess biases for each method and for methods across biomes.

    May 2012 – present                      

     

    Diversity of opinions relating to the practical use of state and transition models

    Grand River National Grasslands, Lemmon, South Dakota

    In recent years, there has been a national push to use ecological site descriptions (ESDs) and state and transition models (STMs) in the federal land management agencies.  In this small study, we asked five experts from one major land resource area to place 23 plots into the best fit ecological state and phase within the state and transition model.  All five experts agreed on ecological state for 11 plots and for ecological phase for five plots.  We feel that it may be necessary to rethink trying to classify land into ecological phase, and that many of the ESDs and STMs could benefit from an expert survey such as the one presented here.

    January 2012 – present

     

    Retrospective remote sensing to verify historical land management changes

    Malheur National Forest, Burns, Oregon

    The use of remote sensing in rangeland management has historically been limited to scientists even though it can be a powerful tool in documenting change on a landscape over time.  If a permittee on a federal land allotment makes a management change which results in changes on the landscape and ground data are unavailable, there are very few tools to help verify the permittee’s statement.  In this case study on a Forest Service allotment in Oregon, we used remote sensing in a novel way that can be replicated by land managers to help assess trends on the landscape over time.

    2011 – 2012

     

    Comparison of very large scale aerial (VLSA) imagery to ground-based rangeland monitoring data

    Grand River National Grasslands, Lemmon, South Dakota

    Used very high resolution imagery (< 1mm) to detect dominant graminoid species in the mixed-grass prairie and incorporated the findings into landscape classification using a state and transition model and ecological site descriptions.

    2007 – 2012

     

    Use of Kendall’s coefficient of concordance to assess agreement of observers of very high resolution imagery

    Grand River National Grasslands, Lemmon, South Dakota

    Ground-based vegetation monitoring methods are expensive, time-consuming and limited in sample size. Aerial imagery is appealing to managers because of the reduced time and expense and the increase in sample size. One challenge of aerial imagery is detecting differences among observers of the same imagery. Six observers analysed a set of 1-mm ground sample distance aerial imagery for graminoid species composition and important ground-cover characteristics. Kendall’s coefficient of concordance (W) was used to measure agreement among observers. The group of six observers was concordant when assessed as a group. When each of the observers was assessed independently against the other five, lack of agreement was found for those graminoid species that were difficult to identify in the aerial images.

    Project website

    2009 – 2011
  • Outreach Projects

    Rangeland Toolbox Series

    Idaho

    This project is geared at providing succinct, clear information about a variety of subject relating to rangelands, such as photo monitoring, to users of rangelands.

    August 2012 – present

     

    Dakota Prairie Grasslands Vegetation Survey

    Western North Dakota

    This cooperative project between the Forest Service Dakota Prairie Grasslands, North Dakota State University, and the North Dakota Grazing Associations provided detailed vegetation and ecological information about the condition of the national grasslands to the Forest Service and Grazing Associations.  The project utilized one-on-one personal visits, field tours, field days, printed publications, and reports to make sure all interested parties had access to and understanding of information.

    2007 – present

     

    TRANSITIONS: Rancher Range Monitoring

    Streeter, North Dakota

    This project sought to educate and mentor private producers on the benefits of rangeland monitoring.  To accomplish this, I designed “producer-friendly” monitoring kits for participants, spent one-on-one time with producers to visiting their ranches, defined management goals, set up monitoring plots on their operations, and published articles in agricultural experiment station annual report.  I worked with producers in 14 counties, two states, and one reservation. http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/archive/streeter/2006report/Amanda/amanda_page_1.htm

    2005 – 2007

     

    Doing the math: calculating a sustainable stocking rate

    North Dakota and South Dakota

    Although terms such as AUM, stocking rate, and carrying capacity are widely used in range management, there is often confusion as to what they mean. The purpose of this project was to define the terms, give examples of how to calculate them, and provide a worksheet for individuals to practice calculating their own values.  This program was presented at field days, agriculture expos, evening programs, and as part of university curriculum.

    http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/archive/streeter/2006report/aums/Doing%20the%20Math.htm

    2005 – 2011

  • Awards and Honors
    • First Place Graduate Oral Paper Competition, Society for Range Management, Award given to outstanding graduate oral paper presentation, 2011
    • Student of the Year, North Dakota State University Master’s of Success Leadership Program, Award given to one student in NDSU’s premier leadership program as voted by students, business partners, and faculty, 2011
    • Second Place Graduate Oral Paper Competition, Society for Range Management, Award given to outstanding graduate oral paper presentation, 2009