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Contact Us

Moscow

Department of
Fish & Wildlife
fish_wildlife@uidaho.edu

College of Natural Resources

phone: (208) 885-6434

875 Perimeter Drive MS 1136
Moscow, ID 83844-1136

Javan Bauder


College of Natural Resources
Wildlife Resources


  • Biography
    College of Natural Resources 
    Degree Program: Wildlife Resources

    Javan plans to continue to pursue his interest in wildlife research by earning a doctorate and seeking a career as a research scientist with a government agency or research university. He hopes to study the spatial ecology of reptiles and amphibians to improve conservation and management planning.

    While at the University of Idaho Javan conducted one of Idaho’s first studies of rattlesnake movement and habitation, including one of the first studies of prairie rattlesnakes.

    Javan’s senior research project, "Movement and habitat selection of Prairie Rattlesnakes in the Big Creek drainage of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Idaho," was conducted at Taylor Wilderness Research Station. He used radio telemetry and mark-recapture to study the movement and habitat selection of these snakes and also how their behaviors are influenced by landscape characteristics, such as rivers, mountains and ridges.
  • Research Projects
    Research may inform future policy and how we interact with nature
    By providing an understanding of how rattlesnakes utilize remote, wilderness areas largely undisturbed by humans, Javan’s study will help scientists better understand a number of important factors, such as:
    • How increasing human development can influence rattlesnake ecology
    • If and how natural landscape features, like mountainous topography, restrict rattlesnake movement, which can help better predict how human development might further restrict their movements.
    • How animals acquire important resources, like food and mates, in a potentially restrictive landscape
    • Data from this study will aid in the future management of this species within the state of Idaho.

    The future looks bright
    Since completing his M.S. degree at Idaho State University, Javan is working as a research ecologist with the indigo snake conservation organization Project Orianne Ltd. In this role he is studying the thermal ecology of indigo snakes and focusing on how habitat fragmentation may be impacting the species. Indigo snakes are at the top of the food chain in areas of the country they inhabit such as Georgia, Florida and Alabama. Indigo snakes play an important role in the natural ecosystem by preying on other snakes, including rattlesnakes.

    Javan plans to continue his educational pursuits and interests, particularly in research, by earning a P.h.D and seeking a career as a research scientist with a government agency or research university. He hopes to study the spatial ecology of reptiles and amphibians to improve conservation and management planning.