Radiation Therapies for Cancer



Tuesday, September 10, 2013 | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Presenter:  Ruprecht Machleidt, Professor of Physics

Abstract

Nuclear physics has many applications. Unfortunately, the more controversial ones, like nuclear weapons and nuclear reactors, are the best known and to some people the only known ones. However, there are hundreds of nuclear physics applications that are a blessing to mankind. In particular, uses of nuclear physics in medicine save and improve thousands of lives every day. The treatment of cancer by proton and heavy-ion beam radiation is one of the greatest success stories that, regrettably, your family doctor and even your medical “specialist” probably never heard of. Therefore, I will tell this story in this colloquium.

Biography
Ruprecht Machleidt has taught physics at the University of Idaho since 1988. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Bonn, Germany. Before coming to Idaho, he was on the faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI) in Blacksburg, Virginia, and the University of Bonn. He has conducted nuclear physics research at numerous institutions around the world including the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, the Canadian Laboratory for Nuclear and Particle Physics “TRIUMF,” Vancouver, B.C., and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. His field of research is theoretical nuclear physics with particular emphasis on the theory of the forces that hold the atomic nucleus together. Nuclear medicine is Machleidt’s hobby.