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Democratic Revolution in Tunisia

Martin Forum: “Democratic Revolution in Tunisia: Effects on Egypt and Beyond”

By Steve Nelson

MOSCOW, Idaho – Jawed Zouari, a former Fulbright scholar and visiting professor at the University of Washington, will present the University of Idaho's next Martin Forum on Thursday, Feb. 17, at 5 p.m. in the Student Union Building Ballroom, 709 Deakin Ave. in Moscow.

Zouari spent two years in Tunisia during his Fulbright Scholarship teaching courses in international relations, public policy and research methods at the School of Law and Political Science, University of Tunis. He also presented papers at conferences in Cairo and Tunis and organized a conference on Globalization and Democratization in North Africa at the University of Tunis.

His lecture, “Democratic Revolution in Tunisia: Effects on Egypt and Beyond” will be followed by a question-and-answer session. The event is free and open to the public.

“Professor Zouari’s extensive knowledge of regional politics in Northern Africa constitutes a unique opportunity for the Moscow community to understand the crisis that has engulfed the Maghrib,” said Kodjotse "Ro" Afatchao, associate director of the Martin Institute and the Martin School of International Studies.

Zouari, a tenured faculty member at Seattle Central Community College, has taught interdisciplinary courses in Political Science and History at SCCC since 1993. He has also taught Political Science and History at several colleges and universities, including the University of Washington, Seattle University, and the University of Tunis. He is currently a visiting professor at the University of Washington.

He has a bachelor's degree in political science and modern languages from Portland State University, a master's degree in international studies from the Henry Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, and a doctorate in history from UW. His master’s thesis focused on “The Effects of Ben Ali’s Democratic Reforms on the Islamist Movement in Tunisia”, and his doctoral dissertation focused on “European Economic Expansion in North Africa during the 19th century.”

Founded in 1979 by Boyd and Grace Martin, the Martin Institute advances research and teaching into the causes of conflict and peaceful resolution. The institute administers an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in International Studies including offering courses, speakers, and sponsors a lecture and discussion series on international topics. For more information, visit www.uidaho.edu/class/martin.