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Kooskia Internment Camp Archaeological Project

Physical Address:
Bruce M. Pitman Center
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4264
Moscow, ID 83844-4264

Phone: 208-885-6111

Fax: 208-885-9119

Email: info@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho

Directions

Physical Address:
322 E. Front Street
Boise, ID 83702

Phone: 208-334-2999

Fax: 208-364-4035

Email: boise@uidaho.edu

Web: Boise

Directions

Physical Address:
1031 N. Academic Way,
Suite 242
Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814

Phone: 208-667-2588

Fax: 208-664-1272

Email: cdactr@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho CDA

Directions

Physical Address:
1776 Science Center Drive, Suite 306
Idaho Falls, ID 83402

Phone: 208-282-7900

Fax: 208-282-7929

Email: ui-if@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho Idaho Falls

Directions

Amache Internment Camp

In July 2010, Stacey Camp and undergraduate researchers Paige Davies and Josh Allen embarked on a grant funded trip to participate in the Amache Internment Camp Archaeological Project near Lamar, Colorado. This trip helped prepare the team for the work ahead at the Kooskia Internment Camp.

Learn more about their trip to Amache on their blog.

Dr. Camp with students
From left to right: Stacey Camp, Duncan, Anita, Paige and Josh. Anita was an internee at Amache as a child.
Josh Allen
Josh, an undergraduate Anthropology major at the University of Idaho, in front of his excavation unit at Amache. Josh, Paige (an Anthropology and Psychology undergraduate double major at the University of Idaho), and Camp excavated a "Victory Garden" made by Amache internees.
Paige Davies Working
Paige excavating a garden at Amache.
Amache Camp Cemetery
Internee cemetery at Amache Internment Camp.
Josh Allen Working
Josh examining a colorless glass bottle fragment left behind by internees at Amache Internment Camp.
Students working
Josh, Paige and University of Massachusetts, Boston, graduate student Laura Ng screening soil excavated from gardens at Amache.
Students Working
Josh assisting with a soil core taken by a University of Wisconsin, Madison, soil studies graduate student. This soil will be processed to help identify the presence of soil fertilizer in Amache gardens.
students holding papers
Bonnie Clark compares an historic photograph of Amache's Victory Gardens with the results of a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey. Victory Gardens, typically comprised of vegetables, fruits and other edible goods, were grown during World War II to boost morale and help supplement Americans' diets in a time of rations. By using historic photos and GPR, Clark hopes to determine the extent of the Victory Garden and identify its contents.
Students on archaeological site
Bonnie Clark shows her students how to lay out an archaeological grid and excavation units.
students on archaeological site
Josh and Paige learning how to lay out an archaeological grid.
paige davies and josh allen
Josh and Paige getting ready for another rewarding day digging at Amache.
artifact
The bottom of a buried artifact.
archaeological remains
Remnants of a garden near internee barracks at Amache.
archaeological site
Internee showers and bathroom at Amache. Note the small rectangular feature in the middle of the image. Bonnie Clark believes this was a footbath internees would use before stepping into the showers.
students working
Laura Ng, Josh and Paige screening dirt excavated from the Victory Garden at Amache.
garden remains
An internee garden at Amache, featuring a reconstructed wooden bridge. Bonnie Clark believes this to be a communal garden, as it sat directly in front of a mess hall at Amache. April Kamp-Whittaker, who wrote her master's thesis on child-related artifacts found at Amache, believes that Japanese American children particularly enjoyed playing near gardens; she bases this off her discovery of marbles and toys near gardens across the site.
students looking at display
Paige and Josh examine historic photographs of Amache at the Amache Preservation Society's museum in Granada, Colorado.
internment camp model
Paige and Josh examine historic photographs of Amache at the Amache Preservation Society's museum in Granada, Colorado.
internment camp model
A model depicting Amache Internment Camp. This photo illustrates the Victory Garden that Camp, Josh and Paige were excavating in the bottom left hand corner of the photo.
students working
Students and volunteers working on cataloging and analyzing materials at the Amache Preservation Society's museum.
sign at internment camp
A photograph of a sign at the internment camp.
students looking at papers
Josh and Paige looking through the list of internees incarcerated at Amache. Josh and Paige were particularly interested in seeing if any of Amache's internees had links to or came from both Kooskia and the Pacific Northwest.
students working
Josh and Paige found several Amache internees who came from Seattle and Spokane.
students working
Erika Marin-Spiotta, assistant professor of Geography and soil scientist, and Bonnie Clark use a handheld XRF analyzer (x-ray fluorescence) to identify the elemental composition of soil near the Victory Gardens at Amache. This will help Clark determine what types of fertilizers Amache internees used in the garden.
students working
Steven Archer explaining how a flotation tank works and is constructed. Flotation tanks separate macrobotanical remains, such as seeds and plant materials (also known as the "light fraction" of the flotation sample), from larger artifacts (also known as the "heavy fraction" portion of the flotation). We intend to build a flotation tank at Kooskia to help us identify the types of plants internees and administrative personnel may have grown at the site.
archaeological activity
The "heavy fraction" recovered via flotation.

Kooskia Internment Camp Archaeological Project

Physical Address:
Bruce M. Pitman Center
875 Perimeter Drive MS 4264
Moscow, ID 83844-4264

Phone: 208-885-6111

Fax: 208-885-9119

Email: info@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho

Directions

Physical Address:
322 E. Front Street
Boise, ID 83702

Phone: 208-334-2999

Fax: 208-364-4035

Email: boise@uidaho.edu

Web: Boise

Directions

Physical Address:
1031 N. Academic Way,
Suite 242
Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814

Phone: 208-667-2588

Fax: 208-664-1272

Email: cdactr@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho CDA

Directions

Physical Address:
1776 Science Center Drive, Suite 306
Idaho Falls, ID 83402

Phone: 208-282-7900

Fax: 208-282-7929

Email: ui-if@uidaho.edu

Web: University of Idaho Idaho Falls

Directions