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Contact & Location

Moscow

Department of English

Physical Address:
Brink Hall 200
(208) 885-6156 phone
(208) 885-5944 fax
englishdept@uidaho.edu

Mailing Address:
English Department
c/o University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Drive MS 1102
Moscow, Idaho
83844-1102

David Sigler

David Sigler


Office: Brink 222
Phone: (208) 885-5030
Email: dsigler@uidaho.edu
Mailing Address: English Department - University of Idaho
875 Perimeter Dr. MS 1102
Moscow, ID 83844-1102

College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences
Department of English
Assistant Professor and Director of the M.A. Program

With UI Since 2008


  • Research/Focus Areas
    • British Romanticism
    • 18th- & 19th-Century British Literature
    • Theory
  • Biography

    David Sigler teaches British literature and literary theory at the University of Idaho.  He is currently completing a book about sexual enjoyment in British Romantic literature, and beginning another project about the politics of the future in nineteenth-century British literature.  He has published articles on British Romanticism, psychoanalytic theory, and popular music.

  • Selected Publications

    Selected Articles

    • “‘The Ocean of Futurity, Which Has No Boundaries’: The Deconstructive Politics of Helen Maria Williams’s Translation of Paul and Virginia.” Accepted for publication in European Romantic Review.
    • “Shaftesbury takes an Ethiopian to the Carnival: Foreignness, Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity in ‘Sensus Communis.’” Accepted for publication in The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation.
    • “‘Read Mr. Sacher-Masoch’: The Literariness of Masochism in the Philosophy of Jacques Lacan and Gilles Deleuze.” Criticism 53:2 (2011). 191–214. Forthcoming.
    • “The Labors of Joanna Southcott.” Literary and Poetic Representations of Work and Labor in Europe and Asia during the Romantic Era, ed. Robert A. Anderson and Christopher C. Clason. Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen, 2011. 209–27.
    • “Dead Faith and Contraband Goods: Joanna Southcott and the Logic of Sexuation.” Studies in Romanticism 49:3 (2010). 405–425.
    • “The Navel of the Dream: Freud, Derrida and Lacan on the Gap where ‘Something Happens.’” SubStance 39:2 [issue #122] (2010). 17–38.
    • “To be or not to be?: Why Hamlet takes center stage in the Lacanian mechanics of perversion.” Shakespeare Yearbook XIX: Lacanian Interpretations of Shakespeare (2010). 107–127.
    • “The Rhetoric of Anti-Pedagogical Sadism in Jacques Lacan’s Seminar VII.” Interdisciplinary Literary Studies 9:2 (2008). 71–86.
    • “Two Masquerades and their Spec(tac)ular Effects in Mary Robinson’s Walsingham.” Romanticism on the Net 46 (2007). http://www.erudit.org/revue/ron/2007/v/n46/016137ar.html

    Other Publications

    • Essays on Helen Maria Williams and Mary Meeke. The Encyclopedia of Romantic Literature, ed. Frederick Burwick et al. 3 vols. (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). Forthcoming.
    • Book reviews in Modern Philology, Pacific Coast Philology, Journal of British Studies, Romantic Circles, and British Association of Romantic Studies Bulletin and Review.
    • *See CV for full listings of publications, research, outreach and awards.

  • Research Projects
    • Sexual Enjoyment in British Romanticism: Gender and Psychoanalysis, 1753–1835. Book manuscript in progress.
    • The Future Histories of Man: Women’s Writing and the Contemporary Future of the British Nineteenth Century. Book manuscript in progress.
  • Awards and Honors
    • Gwin J. and Ruth Kolb Research Travel Award, The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 2011

    • Research Fellowship Grant, Idaho Humanities Council, a state-based program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, 2010–11

    • Visiting Fellow, Chawton House Library and School of Humanities at the University of Southampton, UK, July–August 2011

    • Seed Grant, University Research Office, University of Idaho, AY 2009–2010

    • Award for Excellence in Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Virginia, 2006