• Peter Goodwin

Peter Goodwin

Goodwin received his doctorate in Hydraulic Engineering at UC, Berkeley. His research has earned him numerous awards as well as contributing to several books and more than 100 articles and journals.

Locations

Coeur d'Alene

Phone: 208-667-2588
Toll-free: 888-208-2268
Fax: 208-664-1272
1031 N. Academic Way,
Suite 242
Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814

cdactr@uidaho.edu
www.uidaho.edu/cda

Water & Site Development:  Saving Money, Avoiding Delay

Continuing Education for Engineers



Tuesday, February 7, 2012
12:00 noon

Location:
Jacklin Science and Technology Center
University of Idaho Research Park
721 S. Lochsa, Post Falls, ID  83854

Contact:
Angie Sowers
(208) 667-2588

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Agenda

 

12:00 -12:45    Check-in and lunch

12:45 – 1:00    Overview and plan for the session – Nels Trygstad, President Northern Chapter, Idaho Society of Professional Engineers (ISPE)

1:00 – 1:45     Workshop

Quality at Lower Cost: Strategies and Technologies for Competitive Advantage
Jim Coleman, Coleman Engineering

Solving a problem by meeting a function or need is the role of engineers.  Is there a way to meet the need with a less costly alternative or do more for the same cost?  The discussion will review strategies for development of alternatives, decision making and capital cost versus life cycle cost and what should to into an analysis.

1:45 - 2:00    
Break

2:00 – 2:45     Workshop

Common Design Missteps and Best Practices with the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)
Mike Camin, DEQ

DEQ will lead a discussion on designing small systems and service extensions for drinking water and wastewater.  The discussion will identify potential pitfalls, areas of regulatory concern, and recurring issues.  Our goal is to provide information to design engineers to move through the review process as quickly as possible.

2:45 - 3:00    Break

3:00 – 4:30     Keynote presentation

Water Issues for Engineers: The Long View
Dr. Peter Goodwin, DeVlieg Presidential Professor in Ecohydraulics and Professor of Civil Engineering, Center for Ecohydraulic Research, University of Idaho

Water issues are becoming increasingly complex, with decisions made at one locaqtion in a river basin often affecting conditions elsewhere.  These issues are compounded with the increased variability in timing, spatial distributin and volume of precipitation observed in recent years.  In the face of these significant challenges, conflict is inevitable but technological advances and changes in the way we interact as an engineering and scientific community indicates that we are on the verge of a new era in water resources managment.  Examples will be provided from Coastal Louisiana, California and the Columbia Basin.

4:30 – 5:00     Panel Discussion