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Contact

College of Agricultural & Life Sciences

Physical Address:
E. J. Iddings Agricultural Science Laboratory
606 S Rayburn St

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2331
Moscow, ID 83844-2331

Phone: 208-885-6681

Fax: 208-885-6654

Email: ag@uidaho.edu

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/potatoes

Location

Mailing Address:
1693 S 2700 W
Aberdeen, ID 83210

Phone: 208-397-4181

Fax: 208-397-4311

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/aberdeen

Location

Mailing Address:
3793 North 3600 East
Kimberly ID 83341-5076

Phone: 208-423-4691

Fax: 208-423-6699

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/kimberly

Location

Mailing Address:
29603 U of I Lane
Parma, ID 83660-6699

Phone: 208-722-6701

Fax: 208-722-6708

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/parma

Location

News, updates & conferences

End of psyllid monitoring in Idaho for the 2017 season

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (one field), Jerome (one field) and Bannock (one field).

This week, we collected 22 psyllids from sticky cards (all from Intense sites). 

Nearly all of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program have been harvested. We had traps deployed in the seven remaining fields and found psyllids in four of them.

Thus far, all psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium associated with zebra chip disease.

This is the last week of psyllid monitoring in potato fields for this season. Thankfully psyllid numbers were far lower than last year, and Lso incidence thus far has been lower than we’ve ever recorded for a season.

We are extremely grateful to all of the growers, crop consultants and other cooperators who helped with this project.

We expect to close out this year’s monitoring program within the next two-three weeks.

  • View the “Updated weekly reports” below for details on trap captures in Intense and Light sites.
  • Information on psyllid and zebra chip biology and management go to psyllid management.
  • Posted on PNW Pest Alert Network

End of psyllid monitoring in Idaho for the 2017 season

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (one field), Jerome (one field) and Bannock (one field).

This week, we collected 22 psyllids from sticky cards (all from Intense sites).

Nearly all of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program have been harvested. We had traps deployed in the seven remaining fields and found psyllids in four of them.

Thus far, all psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium associated with zebra chip disease.

This is the last week of psyllid monitoring in potato fields for this season. Thankfully psyllid numbers were far lower than last year, and Lso incidence thus far has been lower than we’ve ever recorded for a season.

We are extremely grateful to all of the growers, crop consultants and other cooperators who helped with this project.

Psyllid monitoring update, Sept. 29, 2017

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (one field), Gooding (one field), Jerome (one field) and Bannock (one field).

This week, we collected seven psyllids from sticky cards (one from Light site and 6 from Intense sites).

Nearly all of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program have been harvested. We had traps deployed in the seven remaining fields and found psyllids in four of them.

Thus far, all psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip. However, with the increased trap captures during recent weeks, some psyllids remain to be tested.

We expect to close out this year’s monitoring program within the next two-three weeks.


Temperatures and psyllid abundance decrease

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (three fields) Gooding (one field) and Power (one field).

This week, we collected 50 psyllids from sticky cards (all from Intense sites). Many of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in 19 of the remaining fields and found psyllids in five of these 19 fields (26.3 percent). However, we are waiting to receive cards from an additional 21 Light sites.

Thus far, all psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip. However, with the increased trap captures during the last two weeks, some psyllids remain to be tested.

The dip in psyllid captures is almost certainly related to the cooler, rainy weather (in addition to the fact that fewer fields are still being monitored). Despite the rise in psyllid abundance during the previous two-three weeks, Lso incidence remains far lower than we’ve ever recorded for a season. Risk of ZC continues to appear relatively low as the season winds down. We expect all of the remaining fields being monitored to undergo vine kill within the next two weeks.


Psyllid captures continue to rise, but season Lso incidence remains low

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Payette (one field), Canyon (nine fields), Elmore (one field), Gem (one field), Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (five fields), Jerome (two fields), Minidoka (one field), Cassia (seven fields) and Power (two fields).

This week, we collected 243 psyllids from sticky cards (94 from Light sites and 149 from Intense sites).

Many of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in all 70 of the remaining fields and found psyllids in 30 of these 70 fields (42.8 percent). 

This week we found 39 nymphs in leaf samples from one site in Canyon County. 

Thus far, all psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

Although psyllid abundance is rising, Lso incidence remains far lower than we’ve ever recorded for a season.


Psyllid captures continue to rise, but season Lso incidence remains low

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Payette (one field), Canyon (10 fields), Elmore (two fields), Gem (one field), Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (five fields), Jerome (three fields), Cassia (three fields), Power (one field) and Bingham (one field).

This week, we collected 126 psyllids from sticky cards (70 from Light sites and 56 from Intense sites).

Many of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in all 67 of the remaining fields and found psyllids in 28 of these 67 fields (41.8 percent). However, we are still waiting to receive cards from 10 light sites.

This week we found three nymphs in leaf samples from Canyon County and 4 adults in vacuum samples from Gooding and Twin Falls counties. This is the first incidence of immature psyllids in our samples this year, which is not surprising at this point in the season.

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

The late-season rise in psyllid captures is consistent with the general pattern we’ve observed for the last five years. However, overall psyllid abundance is still only about 5-10 percent of what we saw last year at this time, and Lso incidence so far is lower than we’ve ever recorded for a season (1.33 percent).


Uptick in psyllid abundance as season winds down

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (nine fields), Gem (one field), Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (seven fields), Jerome (two fields), Cassia (one field), Power (two fields) and Bingham (one field).

This week, we collected 59 psyllids from sticky cards (39 from Light sites and 20 from Intense sites).

As the season winds down, some of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in all 88 of the remaining fields and found psyllids in 24 of these 88 fields (27.2 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

Typically we see a spike in psyllid abundance during late August to September, which may explain the uptick in psyllid numbers this week. However, overall psyllid abundance is still only about 5-10 percent of what we saw last year at this time.


Aug. 25, 2017 — Psyllids monitoring update

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Payette (one field), Canyon (six fields), Gem (one field), Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (five fields), Jerome (two fields), Minidoka (one field) and Power (one field).

This week, we collected 32 psyllids from sticky cards (22 from Light sites and 10 from Intense sites).

As the season winds down, some of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in 91 of the 92 remaining fields and found psyllids in 18 of these 91 fields (19.8 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

Typically we see a spike in psyllid abundance during late August to September, but this continues to be a relatively “quiet” year for potato psyllids. We will have to wait and see what the coming weeks bring.


Aug. 18, 2017 — Psyllids monitoring update

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Payette (one field), Canyon (six fields), Gem (one field), Gooding (one field), Twin Falls (five fields), Jerome (two fields), Minidoka (one field) and Power (one field).

This week, we collected 32 psyllids from sticky cards (22 from Light sites and 10 from Intense sites).

As the season winds down, some of the 95 fields that were in the monitoring program are being vine killed or harvested. We had traps deployed in 91 of the 92 remaining fields and found psyllids in 18 of these 91 fields (19.8 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

Typically we see a spike in psyllid abundance during late August to September, but this continues to be a relatively “quiet” year for potato psyllids. We will have to wait and see what the coming weeks bring.


Aug. 11, 2017 — Quiet year for potato psyllids continues

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (nine fields), Elmore (one field), Twin Falls (two fields), Jerome (one field), Minidoka (one field) and Power (one field).

This week, we collected 26 psyllids from sticky cards (22 from Light sites and four from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 91 of the 95 fields that are being monitored this year and found psyllids in 15 of these 91 fields (16.5 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

This continues to be a relatively “quiet” year for potato psyllids. For perspective, during August last year we were collecting hundreds of psyllids per week with similar sampling effort.


Aug. 4, 2017 — First Lso-positive psyllid collected in Treasure Valley this year

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (5 fields), Gem (1 field), Elmore (1 field), Twin Falls (4 fields), Jerome (2 fields), Minidoka (2 fields), Cassia (4 fields), and Bannock (1 field).

This week, we collected 35 psyllids from sticky cards (23 from Light sites and 12 from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 92 of the 95 fields that are being monitored this year and found psyllids in 20 of these 92 fields (21.7%).

One psyllid collected last week in Canyon County tested positive for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip. This is our first hot psyllid in the Treasure Valley this year and our fifth hot psyllid collected this year on sticky traps in commercial potato fields. Thus far this year, 2.3% of the psyllids we have collected on sticky traps have tested positive for Lso. This percentage is higher than last year, though the total number of psyllids collected this year has been far lower than last.

We continue to urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


July 28, 2017 — Psyllid monitoring update

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (five fields), Gem (one field), Elmore (one field), Twin Falls (five fields), Gooding (one field), Jerome (one field), Cassia (two fields), Power (one field) and Bannock (one field).

This week, we collected 24 psyllids from sticky cards (19 from Light sites and five from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 94 of the 95 fields that are being monitored this year and found psyllids in 24 of these 94 fields (25.5 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

We continue to urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


July 21, 2017 — Psyllid monitoring update

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (four fields), Gooding (one field), Jerome (two fields), Twin Falls (three fields), Minidoka (one field), Cassia (four fields), Bingham (one field) and Power (six fields).

This week, we collected 33 psyllids from sticky cards (22 from Light sites and 11 from Intense sites). 

We had traps deployed in 94 of the 95 fields that are being monitored this year and found psyllids in 22 of these 94 fields (23.4 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

Overall psyllid numbers have been increasing during the past few weeks, which is not surprising given that psyllids tend to become more abundant later during the season. We continue to urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place. 


July 14, 2017 – Lso-positive psyllids in Jerome and Twin Falls counties

Three psyllid collected last week tested positive for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip. Two of these psyllids were found in Jerome County, the other was found in Twin Falls County.

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Canyon (one field) Elmore (one field), Gooding (two fields), Jerome (three fields), Twin Falls (six fields), Minidoka (two fields), Cassia (four fields), Bingham (one field) and Power (seven fields).

This week, we collected 58 psyllids from sticky cards (31 from Light sites and 27 from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 93 of the 96 fields that are being monitored this year and found psyllids in 27 of these 93 fields (29 percent).

Overall psyllid numbers have been increasing during the past few weeks, which is not surprising given that psyllids tend to become more abundant later during the season. It is a little unusual that we are finding more psyllids in the Magic Valley than the Treasure Valley, which is opposite of the pattern we have observed over the last four years. Given the slight uptick in psyllid numbers and Lso incidence, we continue to urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place. 


June 16, 2017 — More potato psyllids found in Magic Valley

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Twin Falls (one field) and Jerome (one field).

This week, we collected two psyllids from sticky cards (one from Light sites and one from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 78 of the estimated 96 fields (81.2 percent) that will be monitored this year and found psyllids in two of these 78 fields (2.5 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

As always, we urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


June 16, 2017 — More potato psyllids found in Magic Valley

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Twin Falls (one field) and Jerome (one field).

This week, we collected two psyllids from sticky cards (one from Light sites and one from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 78 of the estimated 96 fields (81.2 percent) that will be monitored this year and found psyllids in two of these 78 fields (2.5 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

As always, we urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


June 9, 2017 – First potato psyllids found in Treasure Valley

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Cassia (one field) and Canyon (two fields).

This week, we collected three psyllids from sticky cards (one from Light sites and two from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 67 of the estimated 96 fields (69.7 percent) that will be monitored this year and found psyllids in three of these 67 fields (4.4 percent).

All psyllids collected last week tested negative for Lso (liberibacter), the bacterium that causes zebra chip.

As always, we urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


June 2, 2017 – More potato psyllids found in Magic Valley

Psyllids were collected this week on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Gooding (one field), Jerome (one field) and Minidoka (one field).

This week, we collected six psyllids from sticky cards (two from Light sites and four from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 57 of the estimated 83 fields (68.6 percent) that will be monitored this year and found psyllids in three of these 57 fields (5.2 percent).

As always, we urge growers and crop consultants to have an IPM program in place.


May 26, 2017 — First potato psyllids found in Idaho potato fields this season

We retrieved our first set of sticky traps from potato fields this season and found on these cards our first potato psyllids for the 2017 potato season.

Potato psyllids were collected on sticky traps in potato in the following counties: Twin Falls (one field), Minidoka (two fields).

This week, we collected three psyllids from sticky cards (two from Light sites and one from Intense sites).

We had traps deployed in 17 of the estimated 73 fields (23 percent) that will be monitored this year and found psyllids in three of the monitored fields (17.6 percent).


2017 Potato psyllid monitoring program underway in Idaho

The University of Idaho, in collaboration with Miller Research and several crop consultants across the state will continue our monitoring program for potato psyllids, zebra chip and liberibacter (Lso), the bacterium that causes zebra chip. The monitoring program covers commercial potato fields throughout southern Idaho and is funded in part by IPC, USDA and generous in-kind contributions by our collaborators.

The first deployment of sticky cards occurred this week in 12 Treasure Valley sites and 21 Magic Valley sites. Next week we expect to initiate sampling in 15 and 20 additional fields in the Treasure and Magic valleys, respectively.

More details on the program will be forthcoming as we continue to ramp up sampling efforts. To learn more about potato psyllids and zebra chip, including management and scouting recommendations, go to psyllid management.

View full alert at: http://pnwpestalert.net/alerts/index/2017-potato-psyllid-monitoring-program-underway-in-idaho

Pacific Northwest Pest Alert Network

Receive updates on current pest infestations on specific crops.

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Combating Nematodes

CALS researcher leads national project.

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Idaho AgBiz Publications

Learn more about the cost of potato production.

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Nuclear Seed Potato Program

We maintain and distribute disease free germplasm and mini-tubers for domestic and international seed potato growers and researchers.

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Contact

College of Agricultural & Life Sciences

Physical Address:
E. J. Iddings Agricultural Science Laboratory
606 S Rayburn St

Mailing Address:
875 Perimeter Drive MS 2331
Moscow, ID 83844-2331

Phone: 208-885-6681

Fax: 208-885-6654

Email: ag@uidaho.edu

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/potatoes

Location

Mailing Address:
1693 S 2700 W
Aberdeen, ID 83210

Phone: 208-397-4181

Fax: 208-397-4311

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/aberdeen

Location

Mailing Address:
3793 North 3600 East
Kimberly ID 83341-5076

Phone: 208-423-4691

Fax: 208-423-6699

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/kimberly

Location

Mailing Address:
29603 U of I Lane
Parma, ID 83660-6699

Phone: 208-722-6701

Fax: 208-722-6708

Web: uidaho.edu/cals/parma

Location