2012 Advising Symposium Abstracts

Using Motivational Interviewing Principles in Academic and Career Advising to Promote Positive Student Change

Lisa Laughter
Academic Advisor, Pre-Health Advising and STEM Education (PHASE), Washington State University


Cindy Empey
Academic and Career Advisor, Center for Advising and Career Development, Washington State University


Participants in this workshop will learn basic MI principles and how to utilize major MI components in their work. MI techniques will be best utilized with students who may be experiencing ambivalence with their academic pursuits and/or struggle with commitment to academic success. Participants will have opportunities to explore MI strategies to employ when working with students who are in the change process, working with students to help them gain a better understanding of their personal roadblocks and challenges, and help students manage resistance to the ‘status quo’ with their academic pursuits.

Download the:
PowerPoint Presentation
Desk Card Side 1
Desk Card Side 2
"How It Works" Handout
Symposium Worksheet
"Ten Strategies" Handout
Tip Sheet


Collaborating on Student Transitions and Transformations

Leanne Ralstin
Career Advisor, Career Center, University of Idaho


College, by design, is a time of transformations and transitions for students. It can be confusing and often discouraging for them. Those of us in the advising fields know that, even in the best of times, making the next step into a major or career can be a bit challenging and overwhelming. In an effort to best serve students, it is necessary for us to be innovators and facilitators. We will discuss trends, what we do, what others are doing, and how we can smooth out the transformations and transitions process for our students so they can be better prepared for the road ahead.

View the Prezi slideshow


Advising Pre-Health Students

Dr. Alton Campbell
Associate Director, UI Honors Program
Allied Health Adviser
Professor, Department of Conservation Social Sciences, University of Idaho


Pre-health students (pre-med, pre-dental, pre-physical therapy, pre-pharmacy, pre-optometry, pre-occupational therapy, pre-nursing, etc.) constitute approximately 5-8% of the undergraduate student body at the University of Idaho; and approximately 100 students apply to professional graduate health programs each year. This presentation will assist faculty and staff in advising mainly pre-med, pre-dental, and pre-physical therapy students on taking prerequisite courses, gaining clinical experience, developing a competitive resume, preparing for national admission exams, and applying to professional school.

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UI Track Session 1 - Resources for Advising New Students

Kristi Overfelt
Academic Advising and Retention Specialist, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences, University of Idaho

Karen Gillespie
Advising Specialist, College of Business and Economics, University of Idaho

Heather Page
Director, Student Services
Student Affairs Council Advisor, College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho

Andrew Brewick
Director of Academic Advising, University of Idaho


This presentation will equip University of Idaho advisors with the skills and knowledge necessary to address the needs of their students.  Using first and second-year student examples, this session will provide an in-depth look at the online tools and resources available to all University of Idaho advisors.  Specific attention will be given to the academic advising website, Vandal Web, and themany facets of the Degree Audit program. This session is perfect for all new advisors, and anyone interested in learning more about advising resources.

Advising as Case Management

Jackie McReynolds
Senior Instructor/Academic Coordinator, Human Development, Washington State University Vancouver


A case management approach to academic advising can be instrumental to facilitating positive student outcomes related to retention and academic achievement.  The concept of case management spans many academic disciplines, but is generally defined as a collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation, and advocacy to meet an individual’s needs through communication and available resources.  A goal of undergraduate advising should be to provide students with opportunities to engage in problem solving and decision making with the support of their advisor/mentor in order to develop the skills for good decision making that will serve them well into the future.

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Advising Grads

Dr. Jerry McMurtry
Associate Dean, College of Graduate Studies, University of Idaho

Dr. Vicki Trier
Assistant Dean, College of Graduate Studies, University of Idaho

Erick Larson
Director of Graduate Admission, College of Graduate Studies, University of Idaho


Advising graduate students is much different than advising undergraduates. This session will look at the multiple distinct aspects of advising graduate (and potential graduate) students. The session will include a discussion on the distinctiveness of the next generation of graduate students that are just now entering college. The presentation will include a discussion of best practices when an undergraduate student is considering graduate school and how to guide them in their decisions. A questions and answer round table will be included at the end of the session.

SAP and Pace: Understanding the New Federal Guidelines for Financial Aid

Julie Miller
Coordinator of Academic and Administrative Services, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences, University of Idaho


Dan Davenport
Director of Financial Aid, University of Idaho

 
New federal regulations require universities that participate in Title IV financial programs to monitor Satisfactory Academic Process (SAP)in terms of GPA, the rate of course completion (PACE), and the maximum credits allowed to obtain a degree (Max rule).
  
The College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences at the U of I has developed a process in which to review students who are on financial aid suspension and recommend conditions for their reinstatement.
  
This session will cover educating students and advisors on the PACE requirements. It will also describe the procedures and tools used to identify the reasonable number of credits needed for the student to regain PACE and attain a satisfactory GPA.

UI Track Session 2 - Advising in Action

Kristi Overfelt
Academic Advising and Retention Specialist, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences, University of Idaho

Karen Gillespie
Advising Specialist, College of Business and Economics, University of Idaho

Heather Page
Director, Student Services
Student Affairs Council Advisor, College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho

Andrew Brewick
Director of Academic Advising, University of Idaho

Jerry Galloway
Manager, Student Support Services, Tutoring and Academic Assistance Programs, University of Idaho


Intimidated by the prospect of running an advising meeting?  Unsure about how to handle your first unprepared student or your first “crier?”  Come learn the right questions to ask, the right language to use, and important referral information from seasoned advisors who’ve seen it all.  With breaks for questions and commentary, this presentation will showcase common advising scenarios and best practices for handling issues that may arise. This session will also provide participants a step-by-step look at how to effectively navigate online tools during a meeting.  This presentation is appropriate for all UI advisors looking to learn and laugh.

Facilitating Exploration and Commitment in the Transforming Student

Kyle Ross
College Majors and Career Exploration Course Instructor
Academic and Career Advisor, Center for Advising and Career Development, Washington State University


Techniques to be explored during this workshop will include: the sharing of student success stories, the application of motivational interviewing and strengths-based advising techniques, and mapping the path to an optimal capstone experience.Facilitating Exploration and Commitment in the Transforming StudentKyle RossCollege Majors and Career Exploration Course InstructorAcademic and Career Advisor, Center for Advising and Career Development, Washington State University Students transitioning into the higher education environment have the opportunity to explore a range of domains pertaining to their identity development.  Regarding their academic identity, the big question is what major they choose.  Deciding on a major can create anxiety in a new student; on the other hand, deciding too early can inhibit the identity development and transformation process.  In this dynamic session, one advisor will share his advising style formulated from a counseling background.  He will introduce two career and identity development theories that can help promote exploration and commitment and how to apply these theories in advising.

Expectations, Behaviors, and the Early Experiences of First-Year Students

Craig Chatriand
Assistant Director, Student Success, University of Idaho


The habits, behaviors, and expectations of first-year students are continually changing. This session will present self-reported data collected using the MAP-Works retention program. First-year student data concerning student expectations of performance, academic self-efficacy, academic behaviors, and institutional commitment will be presented along with how increased knowledge of first-year students can help academic advisors. Participants will also learn what the MAP-Works retention program is and how it can help the university community better serve our first-year students.

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When Johnny and Janey Come Marching Home: How Academic Institutions Can Prepare for Our Returning Veterans

Craig Whiteside
Veteran’s Transition Seminar Instructor
Academic and Career Advisor, Center for Advising and Career Development, Washington State University


A recent survey of Academic Institutions by the American Council on Education has documented both a significant increase in veteran enrollment and a corresponding flurry of organizational reaction.  What the research cannot measure is the quality of these programs and whether the steps taken to assist veterans are effective at all.  This presentation addresses the diverse population of veterans, veteran integration into the student population, popular existing university programs, and common concerns about veterans such as PTSD.  Hopefully the audience will leave with a better understanding of veteran issues and with ideas about how to move forward with effective University programs to help our veterans be successful students.

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UI Track Session 3 – Utilizing Degree Audit as an Advising Tool

Dr. Susan Hess
Associate Professor, Assistant Director, School of Music, University of Idaho

Debbie Moos
Advising Specialist, College of Business and Economics, University of Idaho


Degree Audit is a great tool for advisors and students. In this session, we not only will review the basics of VandalWeb and Degree Audit but also will explore many of the lesser known Degree Audit tools and how best to utilize these tools to advise your students.

Vandal Web topics will include: Emailing all advisees; Removing Holds; Registration Overrides; Transfer Articulations. Topics covered in Degree Audit: Degree Audit Views; Notes; Planner; Calculator; “What If” function. We will also discuss the benefits of using Transcripts vs. Degree Audit.

Easing the Transition: Do In-Class Miniworkshops on Study Skills Affect Student Success?

Dr. Paul Verrell, Biological Sciences, Washington State University

Do in-class miniworkshops on study skills positively affect exam scores and attitudes toward effective study? In an experimental investigation, exam scores of workshop-exposed and unexposed students revealed no differences in short-term performance. Comparisons of before- and after-workshop responses to surveys revealed small but positive impacts on attitudes toward time management, academic engagement and effort, greater for sophomores than for freshmen. In-class workshops are inexpensive and easy to conduct, and may positively impact attitudes toward effective study. This underscores that, as academic advisors, we must continue to encourage our younger students to utilize all resources that foster good study skills.

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Choose Your Own Adventure: Motivating Students to Maximize Their Academic Engagement through Experiential Learning

Carson Creecy
Admissions Counselor, Admissions, Washington State University Vancouver

Kate McIlraith
Admissions Counselor/International Student Advisor, Admissions, Washington State University Vancouver


The purpose of this interactive workshop is to provide advisors with strategies and approaches to encourage students to take ownership of their academic program through participation in experiential learning opportunities such as undergraduate research, internships, and service learning. At WSU, the idea of experiential learning is increasingly being introduced to prospective students during the recruitment and admissions processes. How will this conversation continue when prospects become advisees?

Techniques to be explored during this workshop will include: the sharing of student success stories, the application of motivational interviewing and strengths-based advising techniques, and mapping the path to an optimal capstone experience.

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View the YouTube video or Prezi slideshow


Working with Students on Academic Probation - A Hands-On Approach

Kristi Overfelt
Academic Advising and Retention Specialist, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences, University of Idaho


The General Studies department at the University of Idaho has developed a new program that utilizes a very hands-on approach to working with students who are on academic probation.  The ASAP! program will help students on academic probation learn and adopt behaviors that are associated with academic success. The expectation is that the probation program will promote a successful outcome, and result in a more satisfying and productive college experience. Each participant of the ASAP! program will develop a better understanding of what is required of the successful college student.

Download the:
PowerPoint Presentation
Mission Statement and Goals
Academic Probation Agreement
GPA Math Handout
Self-Assessment Survey
Student Guide


UI Track Session 4 - Mentoring Students to Graduation and Beyond: A Faculty Perspective

Dr. Frank Wilhelm
Associate Professor, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Idaho

Dr. Larry Makus
Professor, College of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, University of Idaho


A duo of respected faculty advisors from two colleges (CALS and CNR) with different advising models will present and guide a discussion on advising students as they approach graduation and the prospect of searching for that first job. Issues related to completing remaining administrative checks before graduation will be covered.  Discussion will also focus on ideas for being an effective mentor, encouraging students to accumulate important resume builders, and broaden insights to their chosen professions to provide a foundation which will serve beyond completion of their degree.  Audience contributions will be encouraged throughout this session.

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Assisting in the Transition from College to Career: Ideas for Academic Advisors

Dr. Larry Makus
Professor, College of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, University of Idaho

Dr. Bob Tripepi
Professor, Department of Plant, Soil, & Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho

Dr. Matt Doumit
Professor, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Idaho

Katie Strittmatter
Assistant Director, College Retention, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Idaho


Preparing students for his or her ability to compete for and transition to a chosen career is likely not complete without intentional mentoring from faculty or staff advisors. Using a variety of programs, the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences’ three Outstanding Faculty Advisor award recipients will describe how each uses co-curricular activities to enhance student success in career development. This session will present tools that advisors will be able to use for student success in his or her chosen career field. The CALS Faculty Academic Advisors will showcase activities students go through that teach soft skills that employers consider necessary, such as communication, time management, leadership, project management, initiative, etc.

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Advising Students Who Are on the Autism Spectrum

Elizabeth Miles
Manager, Raven Scholars Program, University of Idaho


People who are on the autism spectrum are pursuing higher education in increasing numbers. Many students on the spectrum experience considerable challenges in negotiating the campus environment due to significant neuro-differences that affect communication, visuo-spatial orientation, and organizational skills. Academic advisors play an essential role in supporting this at-risk student population because their success in higher education is dependent upon advising that takes their unique needs into consideration. This presentation provides an overview of the strengths and challenges of people who are on the spectrum and identifies support strategies. This presentation was offered at last year’s symposium.

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Intercultural Transitions: Welcoming International Students to US Higher Education

Tammi Johnson
International Student and Scholars Coordinator, International Programs, University of Idaho

Mary Ellen Brewick
Marketing and Recruitment Coordinator, International Programs, University of Idaho


Adjusting to an American classroom can be a challenge for many international students, but with a bit of intercultural knowledge and sensitivity, academic advisors can help students make a successful transition into their programs of study at U.S. institutions. Culture shock, intercultural communication, immigration regulations, and different styles/systems of education will be discussed in order to provide a comprehensive overview for academic advisors. Participants will also have a chance to engage in an experiential exercise, so come prepared to move around a bit!

UI Track Session 5 - Resources for Advising Transfer Students

Dr. Dana Stover
Assistant Dean, College of Business and Economics, University of Idaho

Dwaine Hubbard
Assistant Registrar, Registrar's Office, University of Idaho

Misty Weber
Transfer and Articulation Advisor, Registrar's Office, University of Idaho


Transfer students present unique challenges for advisors. This session will discuss some of these challenges and UI resources available to advisors as they help transfer students transition to the University of Idaho. These resources include the transfer guide, articulation agreements (transfer plans), and substitution/waiver forms. Commonly faced transfer student scenarios will be discussed.

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