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Counseling & Testing

Counseling and Testing Center
Mary E. Forney Hall, Rm 306
1210 Blake Avenue
University of Idaho
Moscow, ID 83844-3140
phone: 208-885-6716
fax: 208-885-4354

Hours

Counseling and Testing Center Hours
Monday-Friday
8:00 am-5:00 pm (academic year)
Monday-Friday
7:30 am-4:30 pm (summer)

Testing Number

Testing Phone: 885-5138

Crisis Numbers

CTC After-hours Crisis Line: 208-885-6716

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

Competency Based Training Goals

TRAINING GOALS & OBJECTIVES

The internship is designed to offer broad and general preparation for entry-level practice in professional psychology. Specifically the training program offers supervised experiences to interns who wish to further develop their skills by providing psychological services to the college student population at a university counseling center. In order to meet the training goals, interns are expected to acquire specific competencies that are fundamental to the practice of Professional Psychology. The goals, objectives and related competencies are based on the APA Required Curriculum Domains and on the Assessment of Competency Benchmarks Work Group: A Developmental Model for the Defining and Measuring Competence in Professional Psychology (2007), convened by the APA Board of Educational Affairs in collaboration with the Council of Chairs of Training Councils (CCTC).


 

Goal #1: To Train Interns To Develop A Broad Range Of Professional Psychological Skills At The Intermediate To Advanced Level In Preparation For Entry-Level Practice In Professional Psychology.

 

Objective(s) for Goal #1:

1-A. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in individual, group, and couples assessment and counseling.

1-B. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in crisis assessment and intervention.

1-C. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in consultation and outreach programming.

1-D. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in psychological assessment and testing.

1-E. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in the provision of supervision to graduate student trainees.

1-F. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in the provision of alcohol and drug consultation and outreach, assessment, and counseling  for the college student population.

  • 1-G. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to advanced competency in the ability to determine the need for psychiatric services in the treatment of psychological disorders and  make appropriate referrals.

Competencies Expected

Objective 1-A. Counseling. Interns are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Work effectively with a broad range of presenting problems and clinical issues typical of the college student population.
  • Develop and maintain rapport and a positive working relationship with clients.
  • Interact with clients in a respectful and nonjudgmental manner
  • Express empathy with clients.
  • Provide information to clients about confidentiality, informed consent and the counseling process
  • Conduct a thorough risk assessment of the potential for harm to self and/or others
  • Gather intake information and history regarding the client’s presenting problems
  • Use the  DSM-5 multi-axial system to make a diagnosis supported by clinical evidence
  • Identify a theoretical framework as a basis for treatment
  • Formulate a case conceptualization and treatment plan based on client data and theory
  • Select and implement a range of treatment interventions to effectively address the client’s presenting concerns and issues.
  • Be aware of campus and community referral resources and make referrals as appropriate
  • Select and administer psychological testing as appropriate and use data to inform diagnosis, case conceptualization and treatment
  • Work effectively to facilitate the exploration of client’s thoughts, feelings and behaviors
  • Be aware of their personal feelings, assumptions, biases and reactions to clients and how they may affect clinical work.
  • Be aware of their personal feelings, cultural assumptions, biases and reactions to clients and how they may affect clinical work.
  • Be aware of and appropriately address cultural issues as well as cultural differences in the therapeutic process.
  • Write case notes and reports in a clear and concise professional style and incorporate feedback from supervisors
  • Complete written clinical documentation in a timely manner

 

Objective 1-B. Crisis Assessment & Intervention. Same as above, In addition, interns are expected to demonstrate the  ability to:

  • Accurately assess crisis situations and provide appropriate interventions
  • Conduct a thorough risk assessment of the potential for harm to self and/or others
  • Be aware of requirements regarding duty to report or warn in cases of suspected child and vulnerable adult abuse or potential for suicidal, homicidal, or violent behavior.
  • Make appropriate referrals for psychiatric evaluation and/or consultation
  • Consult with supervisors regarding complex and emergent cases or students who may need hospitalization

 

Objective 1-C. Consultation & Outreach. Interns are expected to demonstrate the  ability to:

  • Work with members of the university community to accurately assess need and develop campus programming.
  • Effectively design and deliver effective campus outreach programming.
  • Provide accurate information regarding Counseling Center programs and services to the university community.
  • Incorporate issues of diversity when marketing, designing, and delivering outreach programs
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of outreach programs
  • Actively participate in establishing and carrying out their consulting assignment and activities  with designated campus partners.

Objective 1-D. Testing & Assessment. Interns are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Select and administer psychological testing as appropriate and use data to inform diagnosis, case conceptualization and treatment
  • Administer psychological testing to assess for learning disabilities and ADD.
  • Interpret and write up comprehensive reports summarizing the results of the testing
  • Provide feedback about test results to clients

Objective 1-E. Supervision. Interns are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Fulfill their responsibilities as supervisors as described in the Supervision Contract.
  • Establish and maintain a positive supervisory relationship.
  • Review supervisee’s written notes and recorded sessions weekly and provide helpful  feedback.
  • Provide written evaluations to supervisee at designated intervals.

Objective 1-F. Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention & Rotation.  Interns are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Utilize Motivational Interviewing and Harm Reduction interventions relevant  to alcohol and drug use in the college population.
  • Conduct psycho-educational workshops for students mandated for alcohol and/or marijuana violations.
    • Coordinate and conduct alcohol & drug-related consultation and  outreach activities.

Objective 1-G. Psychiatric Rotation. Interns are expected to demonstrate the ability to:

  • Increased understanding about use and indications for Psychopharmacology in the treatment of psychological disorders.
  • Make appropriate referrals for psychiatry and consult appropriately with psychiatrist.

 

Goal #2: To Train Interns To Develop A Broad Range Of Professional Psychological Skills At The Intermediate To Advanced Level To “Work Effectively With Diverse Others In Assessment, Treatment, And Consultation.”

Objective(s) for Goal #2.

2-A. Interns will demonstrate self-awareness regarding their own identity, attitudes and beliefs, cultural and ethnic background and other diversity factors and how their attitudes and beliefs can influence interactions and treatment of individuals whose identity is different from the intern therapist. 

2-B.Interns will demonstrate the ability to apply and integrate diversity into assessment, diagnosis, and counseling.

2-C. Interns will demonstrate the ability to apply and integrate diversity in the provision of campus programming and consultation.

2-D. Interns will demonstrate intermediate to apply and integrate diversity in the provision of supervision for practicum students.

 

Competencies Expected:

2-A Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • Knowledge of the ADDRESSING model (Age, Disability, Religion, Ethnicity, Social Status, Sexual Orientation, Indigenous Heritage, Nationality, And Gender) and the ability to use this model to understand their own identity, attitudes and beliefs, cultural and ethnic background and other diversity factors.
  • Self-reflection and exploration about how their attitudes and beliefs can influence interactions and treatment of individuals whose identity is different from theirs. 

 

2-B. Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • Respect and sensitivity for all clients who are from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds than the therapist.
  • The ability to apply the ADDRESSING model to understanding clients’ worldview and values, and integrate this understanding into assessment, case conceptualization, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Knowledge of other relevant literature, research and theory regarding diversity and multicultural counseling competencies and the ability to integrate this understanding into assessment, case conceptualization, diagnosis, and treatment.

 

2-C. Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • The ability to apply the ADDRESSING model to understanding clients’ worldview and values, and integrate this understanding into campus programming and consultation.
  • Knowledge of other relevant literature, research and theory regarding diversity and multicultural counseling competencies and the ability to integrate this understanding into campus programming and consultation.

 

2-D. Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • The ability to apply the ADDRESSING model to understanding supervisee’ and clients’ worldview and values, and integrate this understanding into the provision of supervision for practicum students
  • Knowledge of other relevant literature, research and theory regarding diversity and multicultural supervision counseling competencies and the ability to integrate this understanding into the supervisory relationship.

 



Goal #3: To Train Interns To Develop A Broad Range Of Professional Psychological Skills In The Practice Of Professionalism And Legal & Ethical Standards At The Intermediate To Advanced Level In Preparation For Entry-Level Practice In Professional Psychology.

Objective(s) for Goal #3:     

3-A.  Interns will demonstrate the knowledge and ability to adhere to legal and ethical guidelines and professional standards for clinical practice.

3-B. Interns will demonstrate appropriate professional behavior in the workplace.

3-C.  Interns will effectively utilize supervision for professional development.

Competencies Expected:

Objective 3-A.  Interns are expected to demonstrate:

  • Knowledge of and adherence to APA ethical guidelines and professional standards and ethics.
  • Knowledge of and adherence to Idaho state laws regulating the practice of professional psychology.
  • Knowledge of and adherence to CTC Policies and Procedures regarding confidentiality and ethical standards and practices
  • The ability to manage ethical dilemmas by referring to the professional literature and seeking consultation and supervision
  • An understanding of the limits of their own competence and will appropriately refer clients they do not have the expertise to counsel, and will seek consultation, training, and supervision as needed.
  • Awareness, knowledge and skills related to multicultural issues and ethical guidelines for treatment.

 

Objective 3-B. Interns are expected to:

  • Develop and maintain positive working relationships with faculty staff, the intern cohort and other university professionals or outside professionals
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional appearance and demeanor in the work environment
  • Complete commitments in a prompt and professional manner
  • Take responsibility for own actions
  • Mange stress appropriately so that it does not interfere with professional functioning
  • Demonstrate initiative and assume increasing responsibility for activities

 

Objective 3-C. Interns are expected to:

  • Be consistent and punctual in attending supervision sessions
  • Actively participate in supervision and initiate discussion to develop clinical skills and professional identity
  • Be responsive to feedback and accept constructive criticism non-defensively.
  • Complete assignments given in supervision and seminars.
  • Engage in self-reflection regarding their own reactions and behavior as clinicians demonstrate the ability to give constructive feedback to supervisors and colleagues.
  • Demonstrate self-evaluation, self-direction and motivation for professional growth.


REQUIRED APA TRAINING CURRICULUM

APA requires that the internship provide didactic and experiential training in these curriculum domains:

• Issues of Cultural and Individual Diversity
• Strategies of Scholarly Inquiry
• Theories and Methods of Assessment and Diagnosis
• Theories and Methods of Effective Intervention
• Theories and Methods of Empirically Based/Supported Treatments
• Theories and/or Methods of Consultation
• Theories and/or Methods of Evaluation
• Theories and/or Methods of Supervision


EVALUATION PROCEDURES: INTERN COMPETENCIES

Evaluation and feedback are an integral part of the training process. Feedback is used to gauge progress, recognize strengths and weaknesses, and set goals for continued growth and development. Each semester, interns identify specific learning objectives, goals, and special interest areas, and establish a work schedule and contract for the semester. The contract is developed in conjunction with and subject to the approval of the Training Director and the individual supervisor.

Evaluation of Competencies Domains

Interns are evaluated in the following competencies:

  • Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention & Rotation
  • Biofeedback Rotation (if intern selects this as an option)
  • Consultation & Outreach
  • Counseling
  • Diversity
  • Professionalism & Ethical/Legal Standards
  • Psychiatric Rotation
  • Testing
  • Supervision Given (Supervision of Practicum Students)
  • Supervision Received (Intern’s Use of Supervision)

Evaluation Procedures

  • Informal, Ongoing Feedback and Evaluation

Informal feedback and evaluation from the intern’s individual supervisor or other training faculty may occur at any time during the year as an integral part of the training experience.

  • Mid-Semester Review (Fall & Spring Semester)

Training faculty provide a brief written summary of intern progress and performance to date. The Training director meets with the intern and the individual clinical supervisor for the mid-term evaluation. Due to the short length of the Summer semester, the mid-term feedback is oral.

  • End of Semester Evaluation of Intern Competencies

Formal evaluations occur at the end of fall, spring, and summer semesters. Faculty supervisors complete a written performance evaluation of intern competencies for each training component. The intern presents a self- evaluation and summary of his or her progress and also receives feedback from all faculty and supervisors involved in the intern’s training program. Training faculty also discusses and reviews intern progress at regular intervals throughout the year.

  • Submission of Evaluations to the Intern’s Academic Program

The Training Director sends copies of the evaluations to each intern's doctoral program at the end of each semester. If the intern’s doctoral program has their own evaluation form and timeline that differs from that of the Counseling Center Internship, then it is the responsibility of each intern to provide it to the Training Director in a timely manner for submission to their academic program. The Director of Training retains a copy of all evaluations in a permanent folder for each intern.

Evaluation Criteria

There are 2 criteria that interns must meet to obtain a passing grade for each competency. Supervisors use a 6 - point rating scale to rate intern performance on specific itemized skills and behaviors on the evaluation form. There is a separate evaluation with behaviorally defined anchors for each competency. Interns must obtain a minimum average of “3-Proficiency Level” based on this rating scale on specific skills and professional behaviors itemized on the evaluation forms in order to pass. Level 3 Proficiency Level is the minimum acceptable level to pass although Levels 4-5, Intermediate to Advanced Competency, are desirable. If an intern does not achieve the minimum level, then a remediation plan will be developed to assist the intern in meeting the acceptable level of performance. If the intern is deficient in a few specific areas but does meet the overall average for passing then the intern, individual supervisor, and training director will develop an informal plan to assist the intern in improving their skills in the designated area.

Six Point Scale for Itemized Rating Competencies 

6= Expert Competency Level. Performs at the independent practice level in this area and is capable of teaching others in this area. Performs without the need of supervision, but consults when appropriate. 
5= Advanced Competency Level. Performs above the expected level of development. Displays mastery of routine tasks and skill and most advanced tasks and skills. Could continue to benefit from some supervision on advanced tasks and skills.
4= Intermediate Competency Level. Performs above the expected level of development. Displays mastery of routine tasks in this area and some advanced tasks and skills. Requires periodic supervision of advanced tasks and skills.
3= Proficiency Competency Level. Performs at the expected level of development. Demonstrates the ability to carry out routine tasks and skills with periodic supervision. Requires ongoing supervision and training for the development and performance of advanced tasks and skills.
2= Novice Competency Level. Performs at the expected level of development for a beginning intern. Requires supervision and monitoring in carrying out routine tasks and skills. Requires significant guidance, training, and ongoing supervision for developing and performing advanced tasks and skills.
1= Remedial Competency Level. Performs below the expected level of development for an intern. Not able to perform basic tasks and skills adequately. Remedial work is required.
N/A = Not Applicable. Evaluator does not have adequate information to rate intern on this item.

Supervisors also provide a Global Rating of Intern Performance in each competency area based on a 3 point scale. The second criteria that interns must meet to obtain a passing grade for each competency is to achieve a minimum Global Performance Rating of 2-“Performing At The Expected Level Of Development”. If an in-tern does not achieve that level, then a formal remediation plan will be developed to assist the intern in meeting the acceptable level of performance.

Three Point Scale for Global Evaluation of Intern Performance

Level 3 The intern is performing Above The Expected Level Of Development.

Level 2 The intern is performing At The Expected Level Of Development. Any problems are regarded as part of the normal professional growth and development process.

Level 1 (Unsatisfactory). The intern is performing Below The Expected Level Of Development and professional functioning. A remedial plan will be developed and implemented to address the problems.

Exit Criteria

Interns must also meet specific Exit Criteria to successfully complete the internship:

• Complete a full-time internship with at least 25% (500 hours) of that time spent providing direct, face-to-face psychological services.
• Achieve a minimum average of “3-Proficiency Level”, on the Scale for Rating Competencies on each “Evaluation of Intern Competencies” Form at the end of each formal evaluation period in order to pass. This is considered to be the minimal level of skill required to function in most entry-level positions.
• Achieve a minimum satisfactory Global Performance Rating (2 or 3) in all required competencies on the “Evaluation of Intern Competencies” Form at the end of each formal evaluation period. This is considered to be the minimal level of skill required to function in most entry-level positions.
• If an intern is required to participate in a remediation plan to address deficiency areas, the intern must demonstrate that they have followed the prescribed proce-dures and have achieved an acceptable level of professional functioning within the time frame specified.
• Complete all written records and reports.
• Complete all specified requirements and learning activities.
• Complete a final Evaluation with the TD and individual supervisor.
• Complete all required exit evaluations of supervisors and the training program.
• Limited Endorsement. In some cases, ratings that fall below the established criteria (minor improvements recommended and the intern has demonstrated competency in foundational areas) may be sufficient to allow the intern to pass with the endorsement of the Training Director.


Procedures For Responding To Unsatisfactory Intern Performance

If an intern does not meet the passing criteria, i.e., fails to achieve a minimum average of “3-Proficiency Level”, on the Scale for Rating Competencies on the “Evaluation of Intern Competencies” Form and/or receives an Unsatisfactory Global Performance rating (1) from any of the evaluation sources, Due Process Procedures described in this document will be initiated:

Procedures For Interns To Appeal An Unsatisfactory Performance Rating

Interns have the option of formally appealing an unsatisfactory performance rating. Refer to Due Process Procedures in this document.

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EVALUATION OF INTERNSHIP BY INTERNS

Interns have opportunities to provide feedback and evaluation about their training and supervision experiences to the training faculty, their individual supervisor, and/or the Training Director at any time during the program.

Evaluation Procedures

Informal, Ongoing Feedback and Evaluation
Interns may provide informal feedback and evaluation about their training and su-pervision experiences to the training faculty, their individual supervisor, and/or the Training Director at any time.

Mid-Semester Informal Evaluation
Interns provide oral and written feedback about their training and supervision experiences to their individual supervisor and the Training Director during the Mid-Semester Review.

Evaluation of Individual Supervisor
Interns complete a formal, written evaluation of their individual supervisor each se-mester.

Evaluation of Internship Program
Interns complete formal, written evaluations of their internship overall training expe-rience at the end of the fall and spring semesters.

Exit Evaluation of Internship Program
Interns complete a comprehensive written evaluation of the internship program at the end of the internship year. The feedback and evaluation materials are used to help ensure that the training program is flexible and responsive to the unique inter-ests, needs, and abilities of each intern and make adjustments as needed to en-hance the overall quality of the internship program.

Post-Internship Evaluation
Interns complete a comprehensive written evaluation of the internship program fol-lowing the end of their first year of professional practice. They are asked to rate how well the internship prepared them for entry level practice in specific areas of compe-tency. Their post-internship feedback and evaluation materials is valuable in ensur-ing that the training program is preparing interns for the changing conditions of entry level practice and is used to make adjustments as needed to enhance the overall quality of the internship program.
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RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TRAINING PROGRAM

The training program assumes a number of general responsibilities. The training program has the responsibility to provide guidelines, education, and activities to facili-tate the development of counseling skills and professional identity and to assist interns in integrating their personal values, attitudes, and functioning with their professional functioning. The responsibilities correspond to three general expectation areas, i.e., Professional Standards, Professional Skills, and Personal Functioning, and are de-scribed below:

• The training program will treat interns with respect and courtesy in compliance with the APA Code of Ethics, Principle E: Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity. Principle E states that “Psychologists respect the dignity and worth of all people, and the rights of individuals to privacy, confidentiality, and self-determination. In addition we adhere to Section 3.01: Unfair Discrimination which states that “In their work-related activities, psychologists do not engage in unfair discrimination based on age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, or any basis proscribed by law” and to Section 3.02: Sexual Harassment, which states that “Psychologists do not engage in sexual harassment”. The internship program also follows the guidelines in Section 3.03: Other Harassment which states that “Psychologists do not knowingly engage in behavior that is harassing or demeaning to persons with whom they interact in their work based on factors such as those persons’ age, gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, culture, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, or socioeconomic status. Additionally, Counseling Center staff expresses their respect for and commitment to diversity through nondiscriminatory policies in recruitment of interns and hiring of staff.
• The training program will provide interns with information regarding relevant pro-fessional standards and ethical guidelines and relevant legal regulations, which govern the practice of psychology, as well as providing opportunities to discuss the implementations of such standards.
• The training program will provide interns with training in the core components and competencies necessary for achieving the specified training goals.
• The training program will provide interns with training in professional record keeping.
• The training program will provide interns with a minimum of 2 hours of individual and 2 hours of group supervision on a weekly basis. The training program will provide a minimum of 2 hours per week of additional training activities.
• The training program will provide written evaluations of the intern’s progress twice per semester (at mid-term and at the end of each semester). The timing and content of such evaluations are designed to facilitate the trainee’s change and growth as professionals. Evaluations will address the interns' knowledge of and adherence to professional standards, their professional skill competency, and their personal functioning as it relates to the delivery of professional ser-vices.
• The internship program will maintain ongoing communication with the intern's graduate department regarding the trainee's progress during the internship year.
• The training program will communicate early and directly with interns about skill deficits and/or inappropriate intern behavior that negatively affects professional functioning.
• The training program will also maintain guidelines for grievance and due process procedures to address and remediate perceived problems as they relate to training, professional standards, professional competency and/or professional functioning.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF INTERNS

The expectations of interns during their internship at the CTC are divided into three areas: Professional Standards and Ethics, Professional Skills and Competencies, and Personal Functioning.

Professional Standards & Ethics

Interns are expected to:

• Be cognizant of and act at all times within the bounds of the APA Ethical Princi-ples of Psychologists and Codes of Conduct Standards for Providers of Psycho-logical Services, Specialty Guidelines, and any other relevant, professional doc-uments or standards which address psychologists' ethical, personal and/or legal responsibilities.
• Be cognizant of and act at all times within the bounds of the laws and regulations governing the practice of psychology in the State of Idaho included in appropriate legal documents. Such documents include but are not necessarily limited to the Idaho State Board of Examiners of Psychologists Law.
• Be cognizant of and act at all times in accordance with the regulations and pro-cedures contained in the University of Idaho Counseling and Testing Center Policy and Procedures Manual and the Intern Handbook.
• Demonstrate the ability to integrate relevant professional standards into their own repertoire of professional and personal behavior. Examples of such integration include a demonstrated awareness of ethical issues when they arise in work with clients, appropriate decision-making in other ethical situations, and awareness of ethical considerations in their own and other's professional work.
• Maintain appropriate professional and collegial relationships within the CTC and the larger university community and community agencies.

Professional Skills & Competencies

Interns are expected to:

• Demonstrate adequate skills and proficiency in the core competency areas: In-tervention; Diversity: Individual and Cultural Differences; Psychological Testing & Assessment; Outreach & Consultation; Supervision; and in Rotations (Alcohol & Drug, Psychiatry). Adequate proficiency is defined as achieving a minimum average of “3-Proficiency Level”, on the Scale for Rating Competencies on the “Evaluation of Intern Competencies” Form and achieving a minimum satisfactory Global Performance Rating (2 or 3) in all required competencies on the “Evaluation of Intern Competencies” Form at the end of each formal evaluation period.
• Maintain accurate and timely written records and other documentation of profes-sional services.
• Demonstrate regular and timely attendance and engagement in all internship Activities.

Personal Functioning

Interns are expected to recognize that there is a relationship between personal functioning and professional effectiveness and demonstrate appropriate management of personal concerns and issues as they relate to professional functioning. If an intern is experiencing physical, emotional and/or educational problems that may interfere with the quality of their professional work, they are expected to seek appropriate treatment or other assistance to resolve the problems. Problems include but are not limited to:
• Psychological adjustment problems and/or inappropriate emotional responses or behavior.
• Inappropriate management of personal stress.
• Inadequate level of self-directed professional development.
• Inappropriate use of and/or response to supervision.
• Inappropriate professional and/or ethical behavior in the CTC, the larger university community, and community agencies.

If an intern does not meet the responsibilities and expectations identified above, and/or if problems significantly interfere with an intern’s professional functioning, the training program will follow “Due Process” Procedures. The specific Due Process procedures to be used for the acknowledgment and amelioration of intern problems are described in the next section of this document.

DUE PROCESS

This section provides information regarding problems that may arise during intern-ship and Due Process Procedures to be followed when an issue becomes problematic.

Definition of What Constitutes a “Problem”

A Problem that requires the use of due process procedures and remediation is defined as a behavior, skill deficit, or attitude that interferes with professional functioning. Prob-lems may occur in theses domains:

Professional Standards
An inability and/or unwillingness to acquire and integrate professional standards into one's repertoire of professional behavior.

Professional Competence: Skills
An inability to achieve a minimum level of acceptable competency in the skill areas that constitute the core components of the internship training program.

Personal and Interpersonal Functioning
An inability to control personal stress, psychological dysfunctions, and/or excessive emotional reactions which interfere with professional, personal and interpersonal functioning. Professional judgment is involved in discerning whether a behavior while of concern, is within the developmental range of behaviors for professionals in training and whether the problem can be addressed through supervision and remediation.

Guidelines For Determining What Constitutes a Problem

• The intern does not acknowledge, understand, or address the problem when it is identified.
• The problem is not merely a reflection of a skill deficit, which can be rectified by academic or didactic training.
• The quality of services delivered by the intern is sufficiently negatively affected.
• The problem is not restricted to one area of professional functioning.
• A disproportionate amount of attention by training personnel is required.
• The intern’s behavior does not change as a function of feedback, remediation efforts, and/or time.
• The problematic behavior has the potential for ethical or legal ramifications if not addressed.
• The intern's behavior negatively impacts the public reputation of the CTC.
• The problematic behavior negatively impacts the intern class.


DUE PROCESS PROCEDURES

Standardized Due Process procedures ensure that decisions made by programs about interns are not arbitrary or personally based. They also require that programs identify specific evaluative procedures which are applied to all interns, and that interns have access to appropriate appeal procedures.

General Due Process Guidelines: Program Responsibilities

• Provide written information to trainees about the program's expectations related to professional functioning.
• Stipulate the procedures for evaluation, including when and how evaluations will be conducted. Such evaluations should occur at meaningful intervals.
• Articulate the various procedures and actions involved in making decisions re-garding problems.
• Communicate with graduate programs about any concerns or difficulties with trainees and seek input from these academic programs about how to address such difficulties.
• Institute a remediation plan (with the input and knowledge of the trainee’s graduate program) for identified inadequacies, including a time frame for expected remediation and consequences of not rectifying the inadequacies.
• Provide a written procedure to the intern that describes how he/she may appeal the program's action.
• Ensure that trainees have sufficient time to respond to any action taken by the program.
• Use input from multiple professional sources when making decisions or recom-mendations regarding the intern's performance.
• Document in writing and to all relevant parties, the action taken by the program and its rationale.

Notification Of Intern When A Problem Is Identified

The training program has a responsibility to notify the intern when a problem has been identified using the following sequence:

Verbal Warning
Initially an intern will receive a verbal warning describing the nature of the problem. A verbal warning is designed to be primarily educative in nature and typically will occur in supervision. The supervisor documents that a verbal warning has been given and a copy is placed in the intern’s file.

Written Warning
If the problem does not improve within a reasonable time frame following a verbal warning, then the Training Director and the individual supervisor will issue a written warning. A copy of this letter will be kept in the intern's file. The written warning contains the following information:
o A description of the problematic behaviors or skill deficits
o Actions needed by the intern to correct the problem.
o The time line for correcting the problem.
o What action will be taken if the problem is not corrected.
o Notification that the intern has the right to request a review of this action.

Written Acknowledgment
After receiving a written warning, the intern is required to sign a statement acknowl-edging that: he or she has received written notification of the problem. If the behav-iors or skills deficits associated with the rating are not significant enough to warrant a formal remediation plan the Director of Training and the individual supervisor will develop a plan to address the problematic behaviors and/or skill deficits.

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REMEDIATION PROCEDURES

A written remediation plan is required under one or more of the following conditions:

 When an intern has not been able to correct the problems specified in the Written Warning within the specified time frame
 When an intern does not meet the minimum evaluation criteria at mid-term or fi-nal evaluations (see Evaluation and Passing Criteria)

The Training Director and individual supervisor, in consultation with the intern’s Academic Program Training Director, will work together to design a written remediation plan to correct the problem(s). The Internship Training Director will provide the Academic TD with a copy of the Remediation plan and keep the Academic TD informed of intern progress. The intern is placed on probation for the duration of the remediation plan. Probation will be lifted when the intern has followed the remediation plan within the specified time frame and demonstrated adequate improvement to the satisfaction of the TD and the training faculty. The intern and their academic program will receive written notice of successful completion of the remediation plan and the end of probationary status.

Possible Remediation Courses Of Action include, but are not limited to:

• Additional didactic or experiential learning activities and/or continuing education activities in cases where a deficit in professional standards, knowledge or skills is a concern.
• Increased Supervision.
• Change in the Format, and/or Focus of Supervision.
• Change of Supervisor.
• Reduction of the Intern's Clinical or Other Workload.
• Medical or Mental Health Treatment.
If an intern is experiencing physical, emotional and/or learning problems that are interfering with the quality of their professional functioning, he/she will be expected to develop and implement a plan to deal with the underlying problems and seek appropriate treatment.

At the end of the probationary period the TD will conduct a review to determine whether the intern has followed the remediation plan and made sufficient improvements so that the probation may be lifted. If not, then the TD will discuss additional possible courses of action with the primary supervisor and the Director. The TD will communicate in writing to the intern that the conditions for revoking the probation have not been met and will include the course of action the TD has decided to implement. These may include an extension and/or modifications of the original remediation plan for a specified time period or implementation of another alternative. Additionally, the TD will communicate to the Director that if the intern's behavior does not change, the intern will not successfully complete the internship.

Additional Possible Remediation Courses Of Action

Extension of the Internship. In situations where the intern has made some pro-gress towards change, but the progress is insufficient to pass him/her by the end of the internship, s/he may be required to extend his/her stay at the internship site to complete the requirements. An extension of internship may also be granted if the intern has a health condition that prevents completion of the internship within the specified time frame.
Suspension of Direct Service Activities. Suspension of Direct Service Activi-ties requires a determination that the intern has committed a major ethical breach and/or that the welfare of the intern's clients has been jeopardized. Therefore, direct service activities will be suspended for a specified period as determined by the TD in consultation with the individual supervisor and the CTC Director. At the end of the suspension period, the intern's supervisor in consultation with the TD will assess the intern's capacity for effective functioning and determine when or if direct service can be resumed.
Administrative Leave. The intern may be required to take a leave of absence to deal with the problems (including physical, mental or emotional illness) that are interfering with adequate professional functioning. The TD in consultation with the Director will determine the length of the Administrative Leave. Administrative leave involves the temporary withdrawal of all responsibilities and privileges as-sociated with the role of an intern at the CTC. The intern will be required to follow a specific remedial action plan, which must be completed before reinstatement in the internship program.
Dismissal from the Internship Program. In cases involving severe violations of the APA Code of Ethics, where the welfare of a client is at risk, where there is a preponderance of unprofessional behavior, or lack of change in behaviors for which an intern has been placed on probation, or the intern is unable to complete the internship due to physical, mental or emotional illness, the intern may be dismissed from the internship. In such cases, the decision will be made in consultation with the CTC Director and the intern’s individual supervisor. If the decision is made to dismiss the intern, the TD will provide the intern with a written notification of the decision. The TD will also send written notification of this action to the intern's academic program along with any recommendations regarding the intern’s future. Upon receipt of the Notification of Dismissal, the intern will be required to vacate their office and leave the CTC within 24 hours. All keys and confidential material are the property of the CTC. As of the effective date of dismissal, the original contract between the intern and the CTC is no longer in effect. As a result the intern is no longer eligible to receive a stipend.

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APPEALS PROCEDURES

Interns have the option of formally appealing a performance evaluation or other action taken by the training program if he/she cannot resolve the issue with the individual who evaluated the intern. The steps of the Appeals process are:

• The intern must submit a written appeal to the Training Director within five working days of receiving the contested evaluation. If the intern wishes to appeal an evalua-tion from the Director of Training, then the intern will direct the appeal to the Director of the Counseling Center.

• An appeal review panel will be convened and consist of either the Training Director or the Director of the Counseling Center and two other faculty members (one may be selected by the intern). The faculty member whose evaluation is being appealed is not eligible to be a member of the review panel. The review panel will be supplied with copies of the appealed evaluation and the intern’s appeal of that evaluation.

• The review panel will meet separately with the intern and with the faculty member whose evaluation is being appealed within one week of receiving the written appeal to review the reasons for the appeal and evidence to support the appeal.

• The review panel will meet independently to summarize the facts and make a deci-sion regarding the appeal. They will issue a written decision summarizing their find-ings and recommendations and a copy will be given to the intern, the faculty, the in-tern's academic program, and the intern file.

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

When a problem has been identified that cannot be resolved at the individual level or through the use of Due Process Procedures, then grievance procedures described below will be implemented. Interns who pursue grievances in good faith will not experience any adverse personal or professional consequences.

Grievance Procedures Initiated By An Intern

• When an intern has a complaint or grievance against a supervisor, staff member, other trainee, or the program itself, and wishes to file a formal grievance, the intern should first raise the issue with the supervisor, staff member, other trainee, or Training Director in an effort to resolve the problem.
• If the intern is unable to resolve the issue with the individual involved, or it is in-appropriate to raise it with the other individual, the intern should submit a written grievance to the Training Director. If the TD is the object of the grievance, or is not available, the intern should submit the grievance to the director of the CTC.
• If the Training Director or CTC Director cannot resolve the matter, he/she will choose a faculty member acceptable to the intern to serve as a mediator. The mediator will seek written material from both parties.
• If mediation fails, the Training Director will convene a Review Panel consisting of the Training Director, the CTC Director and two faculty members of the interns choosing. The Review Panel will review all written materials (from both parties) and have an opportunity at its discretion to interview the parties or other individuals with relevant information. The Review Panel has final discretion regarding outcome. (Grievance procedures against staff members will follow established procedures for that person's discipline).

Additional Grievance and Due Process Resources for Resolution

If an intern feels he/she has been treated inappropriately in matters other than as specified above, he/she may pursue other courses of action. The intern should first ap-proach the individual(s) who have direct, programmatic, or administrative responsibility regarding the concern to explore the possibility of resolving it through discussion. As a member of the University community, the intern also has access to the University Om-budsman and the Director of Affirmative Action. An intern may also consult the Chair of the APPIC Standards and Review Committee or APA's Office of Accreditation and Consultation.

Grievance Procedures Initiated by a Faculty or Staff Member

Any faculty or staff member may file a written grievance against an intern for any of the following reasons:
• Unethical or legal violation of professional standards or laws,
• Professional incompetence,
• Infringement on the rights, privileges or responsibilities of others;
• Failure to perform in an appropriate and professional manner
• Continuation of an inadequate rating on an evaluation.

When a faculty or staff member has a complaint or grievance against an intern and is unable to resolve the issue with the individual involved, he/she should:

• Submit a written grievance to the Training Director.
• The Training Director will review the grievance with 2 members of the faculty and determine if there is reason to proceed and/or if the behavior in question is in the process of being corrected.
• If the TD and the other two members determine that the alleged behavior in the complaint, if proven, would not constitute a serious violation, the TD shall inform the faculty or staff member. The faculty or staff member may renew the complaint if additional information is provided.
• If the TD and the other two faculty members determine that there is probable cause for deliberation by the Grievance Review Panel, the TD shall notify the faculty or staff member and request permission to inform the intern. The faculty or staff member shall have five days to respond to the request and shall be in-formed that failure to grant permission may preclude further action. If no re-sponse is received within 5 days or permission to inform the intern is denied, the TD and the two members shall decide whether to proceed with the matter.
• A Grievance Review Panel consisting of the TD, two members selected by the faculty member, and two members selected by the intern will be convened to re-view any relevant information from both the intern and the faculty or staff mem-ber.
• The TD will chair and convene a hearing to hear the grievance and allow both parties to present evidence. Decisions by the Review Panel will be made by majority vote.

The Review Panel will communicate its decision to the intern and to the CTC Direc-tor within 10 days of the hearing. The CTC Director may accept or reject the Review Panel's decision, specify an alternate plan of action, or refer the matter back to the Re-view Panel for further deliberation within 5 days of receipt of the decision. The Panel will report back to the CTC Director within 10 days of the receipt of the Director’s request for further deliberation. The CTC Director then makes a decision regarding what action is to be taken and that decision is final. The intern, faculty member, and the intern’s academic program will receive written notification of the final decision.